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Recognizing vocal expressions of emotion in patients with social skills deficits following traumatic brain injury.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2010 Mar; 16(2):369-82.JI

Abstract

Perception of emotion in voice is impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study examined whether an inability to concurrently process semantic information (the "what") and emotional prosody (the "how") of spoken speech contributes to impaired recognition of emotional prosody and whether impairment is ameliorated when little or no semantic information is provided. Eighteen individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI showing social skills deficits during inpatient rehabilitation were compared with 18 demographically matched controls. Participants completed two discrimination tasks using spoken sentences that varied in the amount of semantic information: that is, (1) well-formed English, (2) a nonsense language, and (3) low-pass filtered speech producing "muffled" voices. Reducing semantic processing demands did not improve perception of emotional prosody. The TBI group were significantly less accurate than controls. Impairment was greater within the TBI group when accessing semantic memory to label the emotion of sentences, compared with simply making "same/different" judgments. Findings suggest an impairment of processing emotional prosody itself rather than semantic processing demands which leads to an over-reliance on the "what" rather than the "how" in conversational remarks. Emotional recognition accuracy was significantly related to the ability to inhibit prepotent responses, consistent with neuroanatomical research suggesting similar ventrofrontal systems subserve both functions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052 NSW, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20128951

Citation

Dimoska, A, et al. "Recognizing Vocal Expressions of Emotion in Patients With Social Skills Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury." Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, vol. 16, no. 2, 2010, pp. 369-82.
Dimoska A, McDonald S, Pell MC, et al. Recognizing vocal expressions of emotion in patients with social skills deficits following traumatic brain injury. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2010;16(2):369-82.
Dimoska, A., McDonald, S., Pell, M. C., Tate, R. L., & James, C. M. (2010). Recognizing vocal expressions of emotion in patients with social skills deficits following traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, 16(2), 369-82. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617709991445
Dimoska A, et al. Recognizing Vocal Expressions of Emotion in Patients With Social Skills Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2010;16(2):369-82. PubMed PMID: 20128951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Recognizing vocal expressions of emotion in patients with social skills deficits following traumatic brain injury. AU - Dimoska,A, AU - McDonald,S, AU - Pell,M C, AU - Tate,R L, AU - James,C M, Y1 - 2010/02/04/ PY - 2010/2/5/entrez PY - 2010/2/5/pubmed PY - 2010/5/22/medline SP - 369 EP - 82 JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS JO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc VL - 16 IS - 2 N2 - Perception of emotion in voice is impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study examined whether an inability to concurrently process semantic information (the "what") and emotional prosody (the "how") of spoken speech contributes to impaired recognition of emotional prosody and whether impairment is ameliorated when little or no semantic information is provided. Eighteen individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI showing social skills deficits during inpatient rehabilitation were compared with 18 demographically matched controls. Participants completed two discrimination tasks using spoken sentences that varied in the amount of semantic information: that is, (1) well-formed English, (2) a nonsense language, and (3) low-pass filtered speech producing "muffled" voices. Reducing semantic processing demands did not improve perception of emotional prosody. The TBI group were significantly less accurate than controls. Impairment was greater within the TBI group when accessing semantic memory to label the emotion of sentences, compared with simply making "same/different" judgments. Findings suggest an impairment of processing emotional prosody itself rather than semantic processing demands which leads to an over-reliance on the "what" rather than the "how" in conversational remarks. Emotional recognition accuracy was significantly related to the ability to inhibit prepotent responses, consistent with neuroanatomical research suggesting similar ventrofrontal systems subserve both functions. SN - 1469-7661 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20128951/Recognizing_vocal_expressions_of_emotion_in_patients_with_social_skills_deficits_following_traumatic_brain_injury_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -