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PTSD symptom increases in Iraq-deployed soldiers: comparison with nondeployed soldiers and associations with baseline symptoms, deployment experiences, and postdeployment stress.
J Trauma Stress. 2010 Feb; 23(1):41-51.JT

Abstract

This prospective study examined: (a) the effects of Iraq War deployment versus non-deployment on pre- to postdeployment change in PTSD symptoms and (b) among deployed soldiers, associations of deployment/postdeployment stress exposures and baseline PTSD symptoms with PTSD symptom change. Seven hundred seventy-four U.S. Army soldiers completed self-report measures of stress exposure and PTSD symptom severity before and after Iraq deployment and were compared with 309 soldiers who did not deploy. Deployed soldiers, compared with non-deployed soldiers, reported increased PTSD symptom severity from Time 1 to Time 2. After controlling for baseline symptoms, deployment-related stressors contributed to longitudinal increases in PTSD symptoms. Combat severity was more strongly associated with symptom increases among active duty soldiers with higher baseline PTSD symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

VA National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, and Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02130, USA. jennifer.vasterling@va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20135698

Citation

Vasterling, Jennifer J., et al. "PTSD Symptom Increases in Iraq-deployed Soldiers: Comparison With Nondeployed Soldiers and Associations With Baseline Symptoms, Deployment Experiences, and Postdeployment Stress." Journal of Traumatic Stress, vol. 23, no. 1, 2010, pp. 41-51.
Vasterling JJ, Proctor SP, Friedman MJ, et al. PTSD symptom increases in Iraq-deployed soldiers: comparison with nondeployed soldiers and associations with baseline symptoms, deployment experiences, and postdeployment stress. J Trauma Stress. 2010;23(1):41-51.
Vasterling, J. J., Proctor, S. P., Friedman, M. J., Hoge, C. W., Heeren, T., King, L. A., & King, D. W. (2010). PTSD symptom increases in Iraq-deployed soldiers: comparison with nondeployed soldiers and associations with baseline symptoms, deployment experiences, and postdeployment stress. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 23(1), 41-51. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20487
Vasterling JJ, et al. PTSD Symptom Increases in Iraq-deployed Soldiers: Comparison With Nondeployed Soldiers and Associations With Baseline Symptoms, Deployment Experiences, and Postdeployment Stress. J Trauma Stress. 2010;23(1):41-51. PubMed PMID: 20135698.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - PTSD symptom increases in Iraq-deployed soldiers: comparison with nondeployed soldiers and associations with baseline symptoms, deployment experiences, and postdeployment stress. AU - Vasterling,Jennifer J, AU - Proctor,Susan P, AU - Friedman,Matthew J, AU - Hoge,Charles W, AU - Heeren,Timothy, AU - King,Lynda A, AU - King,Daniel W, PY - 2010/2/6/entrez PY - 2010/2/6/pubmed PY - 2010/5/22/medline SP - 41 EP - 51 JF - Journal of traumatic stress JO - J Trauma Stress VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - This prospective study examined: (a) the effects of Iraq War deployment versus non-deployment on pre- to postdeployment change in PTSD symptoms and (b) among deployed soldiers, associations of deployment/postdeployment stress exposures and baseline PTSD symptoms with PTSD symptom change. Seven hundred seventy-four U.S. Army soldiers completed self-report measures of stress exposure and PTSD symptom severity before and after Iraq deployment and were compared with 309 soldiers who did not deploy. Deployed soldiers, compared with non-deployed soldiers, reported increased PTSD symptom severity from Time 1 to Time 2. After controlling for baseline symptoms, deployment-related stressors contributed to longitudinal increases in PTSD symptoms. Combat severity was more strongly associated with symptom increases among active duty soldiers with higher baseline PTSD symptoms. SN - 1573-6598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20135698/PTSD_symptom_increases_in_Iraq_deployed_soldiers:_comparison_with_nondeployed_soldiers_and_associations_with_baseline_symptoms_deployment_experiences_and_postdeployment_stress_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -