Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Body composition in infancy: impact on health later in life.
Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program 2010; 65:213-20; discussion 221-4NN

Abstract

From retrospective studies, there is substantial evidence that birthweight and the rate of weight gain during early infancy are associated with increased risk for adverse health outcomes later in life. Birthweight is the marker of the integrative effects of the prenatal environment, while the rate of weight gain after birth reflects both genetic potential and external postnatal influences. The adulthood-to-infancy associations constitute the basis for the 'fetal origins' and 'catch-up growth' hypotheses for some diseases. However, these findings are based on the assumption that anthropometric-based indices reflect body composition during both time periods, with the body mass index (weight/stature2) being the most frequently used index. More direct measures of body composition were simply not available at the time of the births of the adults participating in these studies. Nowadays, there are a number of in vivo techniques that can be used to examine body composition in infancy. In particular, what does the body mass index reflect in terms of body composition for the infant? Is it an adequate index?

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20139684

Citation

Ellis, Kenneth J.. "Body Composition in Infancy: Impact On Health Later in Life." Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series. Paediatric Programme, vol. 65, 2010, pp. 213-20; discussion 221-4.
Ellis KJ. Body composition in infancy: impact on health later in life. Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program. 2010;65:213-20; discussion 221-4.
Ellis, K. J. (2010). Body composition in infancy: impact on health later in life. Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series. Paediatric Programme, 65, pp. 213-20; discussion 221-4. doi:10.1159/000281168.
Ellis KJ. Body Composition in Infancy: Impact On Health Later in Life. Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program. 2010;65:213-20; discussion 221-4. PubMed PMID: 20139684.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body composition in infancy: impact on health later in life. A1 - Ellis,Kenneth J, Y1 - 2010/02/01/ PY - 2010/2/9/entrez PY - 2010/2/9/pubmed PY - 2010/6/9/medline SP - 213-20; discussion 221-4 JF - Nestle Nutrition workshop series. Paediatric programme JO - Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Pediatr Program VL - 65 N2 - From retrospective studies, there is substantial evidence that birthweight and the rate of weight gain during early infancy are associated with increased risk for adverse health outcomes later in life. Birthweight is the marker of the integrative effects of the prenatal environment, while the rate of weight gain after birth reflects both genetic potential and external postnatal influences. The adulthood-to-infancy associations constitute the basis for the 'fetal origins' and 'catch-up growth' hypotheses for some diseases. However, these findings are based on the assumption that anthropometric-based indices reflect body composition during both time periods, with the body mass index (weight/stature2) being the most frequently used index. More direct measures of body composition were simply not available at the time of the births of the adults participating in these studies. Nowadays, there are a number of in vivo techniques that can be used to examine body composition in infancy. In particular, what does the body mass index reflect in terms of body composition for the infant? Is it an adequate index? SN - 1661-6677 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20139684/Body_composition_in_infancy:_impact_on_health_later_in_life_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000281168 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -