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Appetitive hormones, but not isoflavone tablets, influence overall and central adiposity in healthy postmenopausal women.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

One of the multiple health benefits of soy protein or its isoflavones may be their purported favorable effect on body composition. We examined the effect of isoflavones extracted from soy protein on overall and regional body composition, taking into account appetitive hormones as potential mediators, as well as the direct effect on appetitive hormones.

METHODS

This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial included 229 healthy postmenopausal women (age, 45.8-65 y; body mass index, 24.9 +/- 3.0 kg/m) who consumed placebo or soy isoflavone (80 or 120 mg/d) tablets for 12 months. We used intent-to-treat analysis to examine changes in body composition (whole-body lean mass, whole-body fat mass, androidal fat mass, and androidal-to-gynoidal fat mass ratio) and appetitive hormones (insulin, leptin, ghrelin, and adiponectin) in response to treatment.

RESULTS

Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that soy isoflavone treatment did not exert a significant effect on body composition measures (P value from 0.36 to 0.79) or appetitive hormone concentrations; the inclusion of covariates in statistical models did not alter these results. Independently of treatment, leptin and ghrelin related inversely to each body composition measure (P values from 0.044 to < or = 0.0001). Adiponectin related inversely to all fat measures (P values from 0.0004 to <0.0001). Time since last menstrual period related directly to all fat measures (P values from 0.06 to 0.0055). Dietary fat contributed to whole-body (P = 0.028) and androidal (P = 0.017) fat mass.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings do not support a favorable effect of soy isoflavone tablets on body composition in healthy postmenopausal women.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0241, USA. : oksana.matvienko@uni.edu

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    MeSH

    Adiponectin
    Adipose Tissue
    Adult
    Body Weight
    Dietary Supplements
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Double-Blind Method
    Female
    Ghrelin
    Health Status
    Humans
    Insulin
    Isoflavones
    Leptin
    Middle Aged
    Peptide Hormones
    Postmenopause
    Reference Values
    Soybean Proteins
    Women's Health

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20142790

    Citation

    Matvienko, Oksana A., et al. "Appetitive Hormones, but Not Isoflavone Tablets, Influence Overall and Central Adiposity in Healthy Postmenopausal Women." Menopause (New York, N.Y.), vol. 17, no. 3, 2010, pp. 594-601.
    Matvienko OA, Alekel DL, Genschel U, et al. Appetitive hormones, but not isoflavone tablets, influence overall and central adiposity in healthy postmenopausal women. Menopause. 2010;17(3):594-601.
    Matvienko, O. A., Alekel, D. L., Genschel, U., Ritland, L., Van Loan, M. D., & Koehler, K. J. (2010). Appetitive hormones, but not isoflavone tablets, influence overall and central adiposity in healthy postmenopausal women. Menopause (New York, N.Y.), 17(3), pp. 594-601. doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e3181c92134.
    Matvienko OA, et al. Appetitive Hormones, but Not Isoflavone Tablets, Influence Overall and Central Adiposity in Healthy Postmenopausal Women. Menopause. 2010;17(3):594-601. PubMed PMID: 20142790.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Appetitive hormones, but not isoflavone tablets, influence overall and central adiposity in healthy postmenopausal women. AU - Matvienko,Oksana A, AU - Alekel,D Lee, AU - Genschel,Ulrike, AU - Ritland,Laura, AU - Van Loan,Marta D, AU - Koehler,Kenneth J, PY - 2010/2/10/entrez PY - 2010/2/10/pubmed PY - 2010/8/7/medline SP - 594 EP - 601 JF - Menopause (New York, N.Y.) JO - Menopause VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: One of the multiple health benefits of soy protein or its isoflavones may be their purported favorable effect on body composition. We examined the effect of isoflavones extracted from soy protein on overall and regional body composition, taking into account appetitive hormones as potential mediators, as well as the direct effect on appetitive hormones. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial included 229 healthy postmenopausal women (age, 45.8-65 y; body mass index, 24.9 +/- 3.0 kg/m) who consumed placebo or soy isoflavone (80 or 120 mg/d) tablets for 12 months. We used intent-to-treat analysis to examine changes in body composition (whole-body lean mass, whole-body fat mass, androidal fat mass, and androidal-to-gynoidal fat mass ratio) and appetitive hormones (insulin, leptin, ghrelin, and adiponectin) in response to treatment. RESULTS: Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated that soy isoflavone treatment did not exert a significant effect on body composition measures (P value from 0.36 to 0.79) or appetitive hormone concentrations; the inclusion of covariates in statistical models did not alter these results. Independently of treatment, leptin and ghrelin related inversely to each body composition measure (P values from 0.044 to < or = 0.0001). Adiponectin related inversely to all fat measures (P values from 0.0004 to <0.0001). Time since last menstrual period related directly to all fat measures (P values from 0.06 to 0.0055). Dietary fat contributed to whole-body (P = 0.028) and androidal (P = 0.017) fat mass. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings do not support a favorable effect of soy isoflavone tablets on body composition in healthy postmenopausal women. SN - 1530-0374 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20142790/Appetitive_hormones_but_not_isoflavone_tablets_influence_overall_and_central_adiposity_in_healthy_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=20142790 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -