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The effects of 12, 30, or 48 hours of road transport on the physiological and behavioral responses of sheep.
J Anim Sci. 2010 Jun; 88(6):2144-52.JA

Abstract

To identify long-distance transport durations compatible with acceptable animal welfare, the aim of this study was to determine the responses of healthy sheep to road transport under good conditions for 12, 30, or 48 h. Merino ewes (n = 120; 46.9 +/- 0.39 kg) were allocated to road transport treatments of 12, 30, or 48 h, with 2 replicates per treatment. Blood and urine samples and BW were taken pretransport and at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h posttransport. Lying time was measured using data loggers. Increasing transport durations resulted in reduced (P < 0.001) BW and increased (P < 0.05) hemoconcentration, but these effects did not exceed clinically normal ranges for any transport duration, and sheep generally recovered to pretransport values within 72 h posttransport. Sheep transported for 30 and 48 h had less BW on arrival than sheep transported for 12 h (P < 0.001). There were no differences (P > 0.05) between the 12- and 30-h treatments in sheep BW at 24, 48, or 72 h after arrival. Sheep transported for 30 and 48 h had greater total plasma protein concentrations on arrival than sheep transported for 12 h (P < 0.001). Although the white cell count and neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio increased with transport, there were no consistent effects of transport duration. There were also no effects (P = 0.10) of transport duration on plasma cortisol concentrations. There were no treatment differences (P > 0.05) in lying times during the first 18 h after arrival. Sheep transported for 30 or 48 h lay down less (P < 0.05) than sheep transported for 12 h between 18 and 24 h after arrival, but there were no other differences over 72 h. These findings indicate that healthy adult sheep, transported under good conditions, can tolerate transport durations of up to 48 h without undue compromise to their welfare.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CSIRO Livestock Industries, FD McMaster Laboratory, Locked Bag 1, Armidale, New South Wales 2350, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20154169

Citation

Fisher, A D., et al. "The Effects of 12, 30, or 48 Hours of Road Transport On the Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Sheep." Journal of Animal Science, vol. 88, no. 6, 2010, pp. 2144-52.
Fisher AD, Niemeyer DO, Lea JM, et al. The effects of 12, 30, or 48 hours of road transport on the physiological and behavioral responses of sheep. J Anim Sci. 2010;88(6):2144-52.
Fisher, A. D., Niemeyer, D. O., Lea, J. M., Lee, C., Paull, D. R., Reed, M. T., & Ferguson, D. M. (2010). The effects of 12, 30, or 48 hours of road transport on the physiological and behavioral responses of sheep. Journal of Animal Science, 88(6), 2144-52. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2008-1674
Fisher AD, et al. The Effects of 12, 30, or 48 Hours of Road Transport On the Physiological and Behavioral Responses of Sheep. J Anim Sci. 2010;88(6):2144-52. PubMed PMID: 20154169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of 12, 30, or 48 hours of road transport on the physiological and behavioral responses of sheep. AU - Fisher,A D, AU - Niemeyer,D O, AU - Lea,J M, AU - Lee,C, AU - Paull,D R, AU - Reed,M T, AU - Ferguson,D M, Y1 - 2010/02/12/ PY - 2010/2/16/entrez PY - 2010/2/16/pubmed PY - 2010/8/31/medline SP - 2144 EP - 52 JF - Journal of animal science JO - J. Anim. Sci. VL - 88 IS - 6 N2 - To identify long-distance transport durations compatible with acceptable animal welfare, the aim of this study was to determine the responses of healthy sheep to road transport under good conditions for 12, 30, or 48 h. Merino ewes (n = 120; 46.9 +/- 0.39 kg) were allocated to road transport treatments of 12, 30, or 48 h, with 2 replicates per treatment. Blood and urine samples and BW were taken pretransport and at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h posttransport. Lying time was measured using data loggers. Increasing transport durations resulted in reduced (P < 0.001) BW and increased (P < 0.05) hemoconcentration, but these effects did not exceed clinically normal ranges for any transport duration, and sheep generally recovered to pretransport values within 72 h posttransport. Sheep transported for 30 and 48 h had less BW on arrival than sheep transported for 12 h (P < 0.001). There were no differences (P > 0.05) between the 12- and 30-h treatments in sheep BW at 24, 48, or 72 h after arrival. Sheep transported for 30 and 48 h had greater total plasma protein concentrations on arrival than sheep transported for 12 h (P < 0.001). Although the white cell count and neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio increased with transport, there were no consistent effects of transport duration. There were also no effects (P = 0.10) of transport duration on plasma cortisol concentrations. There were no treatment differences (P > 0.05) in lying times during the first 18 h after arrival. Sheep transported for 30 or 48 h lay down less (P < 0.05) than sheep transported for 12 h between 18 and 24 h after arrival, but there were no other differences over 72 h. These findings indicate that healthy adult sheep, transported under good conditions, can tolerate transport durations of up to 48 h without undue compromise to their welfare. SN - 1525-3163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20154169/The_effects_of_12_30_or_48_hours_of_road_transport_on_the_physiological_and_behavioral_responses_of_sheep_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-lookup/doi/10.2527/jas.2008-1674 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -