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Isolated and joint effects of tobacco and alcohol consumption on risk of Alzheimer's disease.
J Alzheimers Dis 2010; 20(2):577-86JA

Abstract

The roles of smoking and alcohol on the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain unclear. We performed a case-control study on the effects of both exposures before the age of onset of the disease in the cases (and same reference age for their age-matched controls) on disease risk. Interviews were conducted with population controls (n=246) and relatives of cases (n=176) identified through local Alzheimer's Disease Associations. Logistic regression models were built adjusting by gender, age, residence, education, economic situation, employment, and history of dementia in close relatives. Risk of AD was unaffected by any measure of tobacco consumption. Alcohol consumers showed a lower risk of AD than never consumers (adjusted odds ratio, aOR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.32, 0.88), with differences by gender (women aOR =0.48, 95% CI 0.27, 0.84; men aOR=0.80, 95% CI 0.23, 2.80). Mean daily total consumption of alcohol and time consuming alcohol showed increasingly protective dose-response relationships in women. Lower AD risk was observed in alcohol drinkers of both genders who never smoked (aOR= 0.37, 95% CI 0.21, 0.65). All these associations were independent of the presence of apolipoprotein E4 allele(s) in the cases. Although the sample was small for some analyses addressing these interactions, our results suggest a protective effect of alcohol consumption, mostly in non-smokers, and the need to consider interactions between tobacco and alcohol consumption, as well as interactions with gender, when assessing the effects of smoking and/or drinking on the risk of AD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. anagar@uv.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20164550

Citation

García, Ana M., et al. "Isolated and Joint Effects of Tobacco and Alcohol Consumption On Risk of Alzheimer's Disease." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 20, no. 2, 2010, pp. 577-86.
García AM, Ramón-Bou N, Porta M. Isolated and joint effects of tobacco and alcohol consumption on risk of Alzheimer's disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20(2):577-86.
García, A. M., Ramón-Bou, N., & Porta, M. (2010). Isolated and joint effects of tobacco and alcohol consumption on risk of Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 20(2), pp. 577-86. doi:10.3233/JAD-2010-1399.
García AM, Ramón-Bou N, Porta M. Isolated and Joint Effects of Tobacco and Alcohol Consumption On Risk of Alzheimer's Disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20(2):577-86. PubMed PMID: 20164550.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Isolated and joint effects of tobacco and alcohol consumption on risk of Alzheimer's disease. AU - García,Ana M, AU - Ramón-Bou,Nieves, AU - Porta,Miquel, PY - 2010/2/19/entrez PY - 2010/2/19/pubmed PY - 2010/9/8/medline SP - 577 EP - 86 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 20 IS - 2 N2 - The roles of smoking and alcohol on the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain unclear. We performed a case-control study on the effects of both exposures before the age of onset of the disease in the cases (and same reference age for their age-matched controls) on disease risk. Interviews were conducted with population controls (n=246) and relatives of cases (n=176) identified through local Alzheimer's Disease Associations. Logistic regression models were built adjusting by gender, age, residence, education, economic situation, employment, and history of dementia in close relatives. Risk of AD was unaffected by any measure of tobacco consumption. Alcohol consumers showed a lower risk of AD than never consumers (adjusted odds ratio, aOR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.32, 0.88), with differences by gender (women aOR =0.48, 95% CI 0.27, 0.84; men aOR=0.80, 95% CI 0.23, 2.80). Mean daily total consumption of alcohol and time consuming alcohol showed increasingly protective dose-response relationships in women. Lower AD risk was observed in alcohol drinkers of both genders who never smoked (aOR= 0.37, 95% CI 0.21, 0.65). All these associations were independent of the presence of apolipoprotein E4 allele(s) in the cases. Although the sample was small for some analyses addressing these interactions, our results suggest a protective effect of alcohol consumption, mostly in non-smokers, and the need to consider interactions between tobacco and alcohol consumption, as well as interactions with gender, when assessing the effects of smoking and/or drinking on the risk of AD. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20164550/Isolated_and_joint_effects_of_tobacco_and_alcohol_consumption_on_risk_of_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-2010-1399 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -