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Tryptophan depletion and formation of alpha-aminoadipic and gamma-glutamic semialdehydes in porcine burger patties with added phenolic-rich fruit extracts.
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Mar 24; 58(6):3541-8.JA

Abstract

The effect of added fruit extracts on the oxidation of muscle proteins in porcine burger patties subjected to cooking and chill storage was studied. Extracts from arbutus berries (Arbutus unedo L., AU), common hawthorns (Crataegus monogyna L., CM), dog roses (Rosa canina L., RC), and elm-leaf blackberries (Rubus ulmifolius Schott, RU) were prepared, characterized, added to burger patties (3% of total weight), and evaluated as inhibitors of protein oxidation. Negative (no added extract, C) and positive control (added quercetin, 230 mg/kg, Q) groups were also included in the design. Protein oxidation was assessed by means of tryptophan loss using fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) and formation of the specific protein carbonyls alpha-aminoadipic (AAS) and gamma-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) using liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Both advanced methodologies (FS and LC-MS) were found to be reliable and specific protein oxidation measurements that allow us to gain chemical insight into protein oxidation. The mechanisms likely involved in the oxidative reactions affecting proteins during cooking and storage of burger patties are profusely discussed. Phenolic-rich fruit extracts protected tryptophan residues against oxidation and inhibited the formation of both semialdehydes in burger patties during cooking and subsequent chill storage. In general, RC, RU, and AU were the most effective inhibitors of protein oxidation, with this effect being more intense than that of pure polyphenols like quercetin. These fruit extracts could be considered functional ingredients as their antioxidant actions contribute to the enhancement of the nutritional value of the meat products.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Science Department, School of Maritime Technology, Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Peniche, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20170109

Citation

Ganhão, Rui, et al. "Tryptophan Depletion and Formation of Alpha-aminoadipic and Gamma-glutamic Semialdehydes in Porcine Burger Patties With Added Phenolic-rich Fruit Extracts." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 58, no. 6, 2010, pp. 3541-8.
Ganhão R, Morcuende D, Estévez M. Tryptophan depletion and formation of alpha-aminoadipic and gamma-glutamic semialdehydes in porcine burger patties with added phenolic-rich fruit extracts. J Agric Food Chem. 2010;58(6):3541-8.
Ganhão, R., Morcuende, D., & Estévez, M. (2010). Tryptophan depletion and formation of alpha-aminoadipic and gamma-glutamic semialdehydes in porcine burger patties with added phenolic-rich fruit extracts. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 58(6), 3541-8. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf903356m
Ganhão R, Morcuende D, Estévez M. Tryptophan Depletion and Formation of Alpha-aminoadipic and Gamma-glutamic Semialdehydes in Porcine Burger Patties With Added Phenolic-rich Fruit Extracts. J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Mar 24;58(6):3541-8. PubMed PMID: 20170109.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tryptophan depletion and formation of alpha-aminoadipic and gamma-glutamic semialdehydes in porcine burger patties with added phenolic-rich fruit extracts. AU - Ganhão,Rui, AU - Morcuende,David, AU - Estévez,Mario, PY - 2010/2/23/entrez PY - 2010/2/23/pubmed PY - 2010/7/16/medline SP - 3541 EP - 8 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 58 IS - 6 N2 - The effect of added fruit extracts on the oxidation of muscle proteins in porcine burger patties subjected to cooking and chill storage was studied. Extracts from arbutus berries (Arbutus unedo L., AU), common hawthorns (Crataegus monogyna L., CM), dog roses (Rosa canina L., RC), and elm-leaf blackberries (Rubus ulmifolius Schott, RU) were prepared, characterized, added to burger patties (3% of total weight), and evaluated as inhibitors of protein oxidation. Negative (no added extract, C) and positive control (added quercetin, 230 mg/kg, Q) groups were also included in the design. Protein oxidation was assessed by means of tryptophan loss using fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) and formation of the specific protein carbonyls alpha-aminoadipic (AAS) and gamma-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) using liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Both advanced methodologies (FS and LC-MS) were found to be reliable and specific protein oxidation measurements that allow us to gain chemical insight into protein oxidation. The mechanisms likely involved in the oxidative reactions affecting proteins during cooking and storage of burger patties are profusely discussed. Phenolic-rich fruit extracts protected tryptophan residues against oxidation and inhibited the formation of both semialdehydes in burger patties during cooking and subsequent chill storage. In general, RC, RU, and AU were the most effective inhibitors of protein oxidation, with this effect being more intense than that of pure polyphenols like quercetin. These fruit extracts could be considered functional ingredients as their antioxidant actions contribute to the enhancement of the nutritional value of the meat products. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20170109/Tryptophan_depletion_and_formation_of_alpha_aminoadipic_and_gamma_glutamic_semialdehydes_in_porcine_burger_patties_with_added_phenolic_rich_fruit_extracts_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf903356m DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -