Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Carbon dioxide hypersensitivity in separation-anxious offspring of parents with panic disorder.
Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Jun 15; 67(12):1171-7.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Similar patterns of vulnerability to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) inhalation have been reported in adults with panic disorder (PD) and children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD), suggesting a link between the adult and child conditions. This study examines the influence of familial risk for PD on CO(2) responses in children with SAD. We hypothesized that offspring with SAD of parents with PD would have distinct CO(2) responses.

METHODS

Two hundred twelve 9- to 20-year-old offspring of parents with or without PD were exposed to maintained 5% CO(2) inhalation in the participants' homes. Anxiety symptoms, panic attacks, and respiratory physiology (respiratory frequency and tidal volume) were monitored during baseline and 15-min maintained CO(2) breathing.

RESULTS

As hypothesized, significant offspring SAD x parent PD interactions were obtained for anxiety symptoms, respiratory frequency, tidal volume, and a panting index during CO(2) inhalation. Offspring with both SAD and parental PD exhibited more anxiety symptoms at termination of 5% CO(2) breathing than the other offspring groups and had the most extreme values on measures of respiratory physiology.

CONCLUSIONS

Youth with both SAD and parental PD have respiratory responses to CO(2) similar to adult PD. They might be a subtype of SAD at particularly high risk for adult PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Psychiatry, Richmond, VA, USA. rrobersonnay@vcu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20172505

Citation

Roberson-Nay, Roxann, et al. "Carbon Dioxide Hypersensitivity in Separation-anxious Offspring of Parents With Panic Disorder." Biological Psychiatry, vol. 67, no. 12, 2010, pp. 1171-7.
Roberson-Nay R, Klein DF, Klein RG, et al. Carbon dioxide hypersensitivity in separation-anxious offspring of parents with panic disorder. Biol Psychiatry. 2010;67(12):1171-7.
Roberson-Nay, R., Klein, D. F., Klein, R. G., Mannuzza, S., Moulton, J. L., Guardino, M., & Pine, D. S. (2010). Carbon dioxide hypersensitivity in separation-anxious offspring of parents with panic disorder. Biological Psychiatry, 67(12), 1171-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.12.014
Roberson-Nay R, et al. Carbon Dioxide Hypersensitivity in Separation-anxious Offspring of Parents With Panic Disorder. Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Jun 15;67(12):1171-7. PubMed PMID: 20172505.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Carbon dioxide hypersensitivity in separation-anxious offspring of parents with panic disorder. AU - Roberson-Nay,Roxann, AU - Klein,Donald F, AU - Klein,Rachel G, AU - Mannuzza,Salvatore, AU - Moulton,John L,3rd AU - Guardino,Mary, AU - Pine,Daniel S, Y1 - 2010/02/20/ PY - 2009/02/17/received PY - 2009/11/26/revised PY - 2009/12/11/accepted PY - 2010/2/23/entrez PY - 2010/2/23/pubmed PY - 2010/10/26/medline SP - 1171 EP - 7 JF - Biological psychiatry JO - Biol Psychiatry VL - 67 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Similar patterns of vulnerability to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) inhalation have been reported in adults with panic disorder (PD) and children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD), suggesting a link between the adult and child conditions. This study examines the influence of familial risk for PD on CO(2) responses in children with SAD. We hypothesized that offspring with SAD of parents with PD would have distinct CO(2) responses. METHODS: Two hundred twelve 9- to 20-year-old offspring of parents with or without PD were exposed to maintained 5% CO(2) inhalation in the participants' homes. Anxiety symptoms, panic attacks, and respiratory physiology (respiratory frequency and tidal volume) were monitored during baseline and 15-min maintained CO(2) breathing. RESULTS: As hypothesized, significant offspring SAD x parent PD interactions were obtained for anxiety symptoms, respiratory frequency, tidal volume, and a panting index during CO(2) inhalation. Offspring with both SAD and parental PD exhibited more anxiety symptoms at termination of 5% CO(2) breathing than the other offspring groups and had the most extreme values on measures of respiratory physiology. CONCLUSIONS: Youth with both SAD and parental PD have respiratory responses to CO(2) similar to adult PD. They might be a subtype of SAD at particularly high risk for adult PD. SN - 1873-2402 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20172505/Carbon_dioxide_hypersensitivity_in_separation_anxious_offspring_of_parents_with_panic_disorder_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-3223(09)01475-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -