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Race, ethnicity, and pain among the U.S. adult population.
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2010 Feb; 21(1):177-220.JH

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

There is reliable evidence that racial/ethnic minorities suffer disproportionately from unrelieved pain compared with Whites. Several factors may contribute to disparities in pain management. Understanding how these factors influence effective pain management among racial/ethnic minority populations would be helpful for developing tailored interventions designed to eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in pain management. We conducted a review of the literature to explore the interaction between race/ethnicity, cultural influences; pain perception, assessment, and communication; provider and patient characteristics; and health system factors and how they might contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of effective pain management.

METHODS

The published literature from 1990-2008 was searched for articles with data on racial/ethnic patterns of pain management as well as racially, ethnically, and culturally-specific attitudes toward pain, pain assessment, and communication; provider prescribing patterns; community access to pain medications; and pain coping strategies among U.S. adults.

RESULTS

The literature suggests that racial/ethnic disparities in pain management may operate through limited access to health care and appropriate analgesics; patient access to or utilization of pain specialists; miscommunication and/or misperceptions about the presence and/or severity of pain; patient attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that influence the acceptance of appropriate analgesics and analgesic doses; and provider attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about patient pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Applied Research Program, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, MD 20892-7344, USA. shaversv@mail.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20173263

Citation

Shavers, Vickie L., et al. "Race, Ethnicity, and Pain Among the U.S. Adult Population." Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, vol. 21, no. 1, 2010, pp. 177-220.
Shavers VL, Bakos A, Sheppard VB. Race, ethnicity, and pain among the U.S. adult population. J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2010;21(1):177-220.
Shavers, V. L., Bakos, A., & Sheppard, V. B. (2010). Race, ethnicity, and pain among the U.S. adult population. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 21(1), 177-220. https://doi.org/10.1353/hpu.0.0255
Shavers VL, Bakos A, Sheppard VB. Race, Ethnicity, and Pain Among the U.S. Adult Population. J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2010;21(1):177-220. PubMed PMID: 20173263.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race, ethnicity, and pain among the U.S. adult population. AU - Shavers,Vickie L, AU - Bakos,Alexis, AU - Sheppard,Vanessa B, PY - 2010/2/23/entrez PY - 2010/2/23/pubmed PY - 2010/5/4/medline SP - 177 EP - 220 JF - Journal of health care for the poor and underserved JO - J Health Care Poor Underserved VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: There is reliable evidence that racial/ethnic minorities suffer disproportionately from unrelieved pain compared with Whites. Several factors may contribute to disparities in pain management. Understanding how these factors influence effective pain management among racial/ethnic minority populations would be helpful for developing tailored interventions designed to eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in pain management. We conducted a review of the literature to explore the interaction between race/ethnicity, cultural influences; pain perception, assessment, and communication; provider and patient characteristics; and health system factors and how they might contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in receipt of effective pain management. METHODS: The published literature from 1990-2008 was searched for articles with data on racial/ethnic patterns of pain management as well as racially, ethnically, and culturally-specific attitudes toward pain, pain assessment, and communication; provider prescribing patterns; community access to pain medications; and pain coping strategies among U.S. adults. RESULTS: The literature suggests that racial/ethnic disparities in pain management may operate through limited access to health care and appropriate analgesics; patient access to or utilization of pain specialists; miscommunication and/or misperceptions about the presence and/or severity of pain; patient attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors that influence the acceptance of appropriate analgesics and analgesic doses; and provider attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about patient pain. SN - 1548-6869 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20173263/Race_ethnicity_and_pain_among_the_U_S__adult_population_ L2 - http://muse.jhu.edu/cgi-bin/resolve_openurl.cgi?issn=1049-2089&volume=21&issue=1&spage=177&aulast=Shavers DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -