Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Movement velocity as a measure of loading intensity in resistance training.
Int J Sports Med. 2010 May; 31(5):347-52.IJ

Abstract

This study examined the possibility of using movement velocity as an indicator of relative load in the bench press (BP) exercise. One hundred and twenty strength-trained males performed a test (T1) with increasing loads for the individual determination of the one-repetition maximum (1RM) and full load-velocity profile. Fifty-six subjects performed the test on a second occasion (T2) following 6 weeks of training. A very close relationship between mean propulsive velocity (MPV) and load (%1RM) was observed (R (2)=0.98). Mean velocity attained with 1RM was 0.16+/-0.04 m x s(-1) and was found to influence the MPV attained with each %1RM. Despite a mean increase of 9.3% in 1RM from T1 to T2, MPV for each %1RM remained stable. Stability in the load-velocity relationship was also confirmed regardless of individual relative strength. These results confirm an inextricable relationship between relative load and MPV in the BP that makes it possible to: 1) evaluate maximal strength without the need to perform a 1RM test, or test of maximum number of repetitions to failure (XRM); 2) determine the %1RM that is being used as soon as the first repetition with any given load is performed; 3) prescribe and monitor training load according to velocity, instead of percentages of 1RM or XRM.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pablo de Olavide University, Faculty of Sport, Seville, Spain.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20180176

Citation

González-Badillo, J J., and L Sánchez-Medina. "Movement Velocity as a Measure of Loading Intensity in Resistance Training." International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 31, no. 5, 2010, pp. 347-52.
González-Badillo JJ, Sánchez-Medina L. Movement velocity as a measure of loading intensity in resistance training. Int J Sports Med. 2010;31(5):347-52.
González-Badillo, J. J., & Sánchez-Medina, L. (2010). Movement velocity as a measure of loading intensity in resistance training. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 31(5), 347-52. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1248333
González-Badillo JJ, Sánchez-Medina L. Movement Velocity as a Measure of Loading Intensity in Resistance Training. Int J Sports Med. 2010;31(5):347-52. PubMed PMID: 20180176.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Movement velocity as a measure of loading intensity in resistance training. AU - González-Badillo,J J, AU - Sánchez-Medina,L, Y1 - 2010/02/23/ PY - 2010/2/25/entrez PY - 2010/2/25/pubmed PY - 2010/8/7/medline SP - 347 EP - 52 JF - International journal of sports medicine JO - Int J Sports Med VL - 31 IS - 5 N2 - This study examined the possibility of using movement velocity as an indicator of relative load in the bench press (BP) exercise. One hundred and twenty strength-trained males performed a test (T1) with increasing loads for the individual determination of the one-repetition maximum (1RM) and full load-velocity profile. Fifty-six subjects performed the test on a second occasion (T2) following 6 weeks of training. A very close relationship between mean propulsive velocity (MPV) and load (%1RM) was observed (R (2)=0.98). Mean velocity attained with 1RM was 0.16+/-0.04 m x s(-1) and was found to influence the MPV attained with each %1RM. Despite a mean increase of 9.3% in 1RM from T1 to T2, MPV for each %1RM remained stable. Stability in the load-velocity relationship was also confirmed regardless of individual relative strength. These results confirm an inextricable relationship between relative load and MPV in the BP that makes it possible to: 1) evaluate maximal strength without the need to perform a 1RM test, or test of maximum number of repetitions to failure (XRM); 2) determine the %1RM that is being used as soon as the first repetition with any given load is performed; 3) prescribe and monitor training load according to velocity, instead of percentages of 1RM or XRM. SN - 1439-3964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20180176/Movement_velocity_as_a_measure_of_loading_intensity_in_resistance_training_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0030-1248333 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -