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Can nutrients prevent or delay onset of Alzheimer's disease?
J Alzheimers Dis 2010; 20(3):765-75JA

Abstract

Age-related changes in nutritional status can play an important role in brain functioning. Specific nutrient deficiencies in the elderly, including omega-3 fatty acids, B-vitamins, and antioxidants among others, may exacerbate pathological processes in the brain. Consequently, the potential of nutritional intervention to prevent or delay cognitive impairment and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a topic of growing scientific interest. This review summarizes epidemiological studies linking specific nutritional deficiencies to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as well as completed and ongoing nutritional studies in prevention of MCI and AD. Processes that underlie AD pathogenesis include: membrane/synaptic degeneration, abnormal protein processing (amyloid-beta, tau), vascular risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia), inflammation, and oxidative stress. Consideration of mechanistic evidence to date suggests that several nutritional components can effectively counteract these processes, e.g., by promoting membrane formation and synaptogenesis, enhancing memory/behavior, improving endothelial function, and cerebrovascular health. The literature reinforces the need for early intervention in AD and suggests that multi-nutritional intervention, targeting multiple aspects of the neurodegenerative process during the earliest possible phase in the development of the disease, is likely to have the greatest therapeutic potential.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Danone Research, Centre for Specialised Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands. Patrick.Kamphuis@danone.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20182021

Citation

Kamphuis, Patrick J G H., and Philip Scheltens. "Can Nutrients Prevent or Delay Onset of Alzheimer's Disease?" Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 20, no. 3, 2010, pp. 765-75.
Kamphuis PJ, Scheltens P. Can nutrients prevent or delay onset of Alzheimer's disease? J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20(3):765-75.
Kamphuis, P. J., & Scheltens, P. (2010). Can nutrients prevent or delay onset of Alzheimer's disease? Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 20(3), pp. 765-75. doi:10.3233/JAD-2010-091558.
Kamphuis PJ, Scheltens P. Can Nutrients Prevent or Delay Onset of Alzheimer's Disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2010;20(3):765-75. PubMed PMID: 20182021.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Can nutrients prevent or delay onset of Alzheimer's disease? AU - Kamphuis,Patrick J G H, AU - Scheltens,Philip, PY - 2010/2/26/entrez PY - 2010/2/26/pubmed PY - 2010/9/9/medline SP - 765 EP - 75 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - Age-related changes in nutritional status can play an important role in brain functioning. Specific nutrient deficiencies in the elderly, including omega-3 fatty acids, B-vitamins, and antioxidants among others, may exacerbate pathological processes in the brain. Consequently, the potential of nutritional intervention to prevent or delay cognitive impairment and the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a topic of growing scientific interest. This review summarizes epidemiological studies linking specific nutritional deficiencies to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as well as completed and ongoing nutritional studies in prevention of MCI and AD. Processes that underlie AD pathogenesis include: membrane/synaptic degeneration, abnormal protein processing (amyloid-beta, tau), vascular risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia), inflammation, and oxidative stress. Consideration of mechanistic evidence to date suggests that several nutritional components can effectively counteract these processes, e.g., by promoting membrane formation and synaptogenesis, enhancing memory/behavior, improving endothelial function, and cerebrovascular health. The literature reinforces the need for early intervention in AD and suggests that multi-nutritional intervention, targeting multiple aspects of the neurodegenerative process during the earliest possible phase in the development of the disease, is likely to have the greatest therapeutic potential. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20182021/Can_nutrients_prevent_or_delay_onset_of_Alzheimer's_disease L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-2010-091558 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -