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Autologous cranial particulate bone grafting reduces the frequency of osseous defects after cranial expansion.
J Craniofac Surg. 2010 Mar; 21(2):318-22.JC

Abstract

Primary autologous particulate bone grafting has been demonstrated to heal osseous defects after fronto-orbital advancement. We sought to determine if this technique was equally effective for larger defects resulting from major cranial expansion procedures. We studied children who underwent cranial expansion (other than fronto-orbital advancement) between 1989 and 2008. Defects either were left to heal spontaneously (group 1) or had autologous cranial particulate bone graft placed over dura at the time of cranial expansion (group 2). Particulate bone graft was harvested from the endocortical or ectocortical surface using a hand-driven brace and bit. Outcome variables were ossification and need for revision cranioplasty. The study included 53 children. Mean (SD) age at procedure was 12.2 (8.1) months (range, 1.0-36.0 months) for group 1 (n = 15) and 20.2 (15.1) months (range, 3.3-78.6 months) for group 2 (n = 38) (P = 0.06). There were palpable bony defects in 33.0% (n = 5) of group 1 patients versus 7.9% (n = 3) of group 2 patients (P = 0.03). Corrective cranioplasty was needed in 26.7% of group 1 patients and only 5.3% of those in group 2 (P = 0.04). Primary cranial particulate bone grafting significantly reduced the frequency of osseous defects and secondary cranioplasty following cranial remodeling.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Craniofacial Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20186093

Citation

Gao, Lin Lin, et al. "Autologous Cranial Particulate Bone Grafting Reduces the Frequency of Osseous Defects After Cranial Expansion." The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 21, no. 2, 2010, pp. 318-22.
Gao LL, Rogers GF, Clune JE, et al. Autologous cranial particulate bone grafting reduces the frequency of osseous defects after cranial expansion. J Craniofac Surg. 2010;21(2):318-22.
Gao, L. L., Rogers, G. F., Clune, J. E., Proctor, M. R., Meara, J. G., Mulliken, J. B., & Greene, A. K. (2010). Autologous cranial particulate bone grafting reduces the frequency of osseous defects after cranial expansion. The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 21(2), 318-22. https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e3181cf5f8b
Gao LL, et al. Autologous Cranial Particulate Bone Grafting Reduces the Frequency of Osseous Defects After Cranial Expansion. J Craniofac Surg. 2010;21(2):318-22. PubMed PMID: 20186093.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Autologous cranial particulate bone grafting reduces the frequency of osseous defects after cranial expansion. AU - Gao,Lin Lin, AU - Rogers,Gary F, AU - Clune,James E, AU - Proctor,Mark R, AU - Meara,John G, AU - Mulliken,John B, AU - Greene,Arin K, PY - 2010/2/27/entrez PY - 2010/2/27/pubmed PY - 2010/9/30/medline SP - 318 EP - 22 JF - The Journal of craniofacial surgery JO - J Craniofac Surg VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - Primary autologous particulate bone grafting has been demonstrated to heal osseous defects after fronto-orbital advancement. We sought to determine if this technique was equally effective for larger defects resulting from major cranial expansion procedures. We studied children who underwent cranial expansion (other than fronto-orbital advancement) between 1989 and 2008. Defects either were left to heal spontaneously (group 1) or had autologous cranial particulate bone graft placed over dura at the time of cranial expansion (group 2). Particulate bone graft was harvested from the endocortical or ectocortical surface using a hand-driven brace and bit. Outcome variables were ossification and need for revision cranioplasty. The study included 53 children. Mean (SD) age at procedure was 12.2 (8.1) months (range, 1.0-36.0 months) for group 1 (n = 15) and 20.2 (15.1) months (range, 3.3-78.6 months) for group 2 (n = 38) (P = 0.06). There were palpable bony defects in 33.0% (n = 5) of group 1 patients versus 7.9% (n = 3) of group 2 patients (P = 0.03). Corrective cranioplasty was needed in 26.7% of group 1 patients and only 5.3% of those in group 2 (P = 0.04). Primary cranial particulate bone grafting significantly reduced the frequency of osseous defects and secondary cranioplasty following cranial remodeling. SN - 1536-3732 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20186093/Autologous_cranial_particulate_bone_grafting_reduces_the_frequency_of_osseous_defects_after_cranial_expansion_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e3181cf5f8b DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -