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Mulberry fruit protects dopaminergic neurons in toxin-induced Parkinson's disease models.
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul; 104(1):8-16.BJ

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD), one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, is characterised by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) to the striatum (ST), and involves oxidative stress. Mulberry fruit from Morus alba L. (Moraceae) is commonly eaten, and has long been used in traditional oriental medicine. It contains well-known antioxidant agents such as anthocyanins. The present study examined the protective effects of 70 % ethanol extract of mulberry fruit (ME) against neurotoxicity in in vitro and in vivo PD models. In SH-SY5Y cells stressed with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), ME significantly protected the cells from neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Other assays demonstrated that the protective effect of ME was mediated by its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects, regulating reactive oxygen species and NO generation, Bcl-2 and Bax proteins, mitochondrial membrane depolarisation and caspase-3 activation. In mesencephalic primary cells stressed with 6-OHDA or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), pre-treatment with ME also protected dopamine neurons, showing a wide range of effective concentrations in MPP+-induced toxicity. In the sub-acute mouse PD model induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), ME showed a preventative effect against PD-like symptoms (bradykinesia) in the behavioural test and prevented MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage in an immunocytochemical analysis of the SNpc and ST. These results indicate that ME has neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo PD models, and that it may be useful in preventing or treating PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oriental Pharmaceutical Science and Kyung Hee East-West Pharmaceutical Research Institute, College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701, South Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20187987

Citation

Kim, Hyo Geun, et al. "Mulberry Fruit Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in Toxin-induced Parkinson's Disease Models." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 104, no. 1, 2010, pp. 8-16.
Kim HG, Ju MS, Shim JS, et al. Mulberry fruit protects dopaminergic neurons in toxin-induced Parkinson's disease models. Br J Nutr. 2010;104(1):8-16.
Kim, H. G., Ju, M. S., Shim, J. S., Kim, M. C., Lee, S. H., Huh, Y., Kim, S. Y., & Oh, M. S. (2010). Mulberry fruit protects dopaminergic neurons in toxin-induced Parkinson's disease models. The British Journal of Nutrition, 104(1), 8-16. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114510000218
Kim HG, et al. Mulberry Fruit Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in Toxin-induced Parkinson's Disease Models. Br J Nutr. 2010;104(1):8-16. PubMed PMID: 20187987.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mulberry fruit protects dopaminergic neurons in toxin-induced Parkinson's disease models. AU - Kim,Hyo Geun, AU - Ju,Mi Sun, AU - Shim,Jin Sup, AU - Kim,Min Cheol, AU - Lee,Sang-Hun, AU - Huh,Youngbuhm, AU - Kim,Sun Yeou, AU - Oh,Myung Sook, Y1 - 2010/02/26/ PY - 2010/3/2/entrez PY - 2010/3/2/pubmed PY - 2010/7/10/medline SP - 8 EP - 16 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 104 IS - 1 N2 - Parkinson's disease (PD), one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, is characterised by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) to the striatum (ST), and involves oxidative stress. Mulberry fruit from Morus alba L. (Moraceae) is commonly eaten, and has long been used in traditional oriental medicine. It contains well-known antioxidant agents such as anthocyanins. The present study examined the protective effects of 70 % ethanol extract of mulberry fruit (ME) against neurotoxicity in in vitro and in vivo PD models. In SH-SY5Y cells stressed with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), ME significantly protected the cells from neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Other assays demonstrated that the protective effect of ME was mediated by its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects, regulating reactive oxygen species and NO generation, Bcl-2 and Bax proteins, mitochondrial membrane depolarisation and caspase-3 activation. In mesencephalic primary cells stressed with 6-OHDA or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), pre-treatment with ME also protected dopamine neurons, showing a wide range of effective concentrations in MPP+-induced toxicity. In the sub-acute mouse PD model induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), ME showed a preventative effect against PD-like symptoms (bradykinesia) in the behavioural test and prevented MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage in an immunocytochemical analysis of the SNpc and ST. These results indicate that ME has neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo PD models, and that it may be useful in preventing or treating PD. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20187987/Mulberry_fruit_protects_dopaminergic_neurons_in_toxin_induced_Parkinson's_disease_models_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114510000218/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -