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Maternal early pregnancy vitamin D status in relation to fetal and neonatal growth: results of the multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort.
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul; 104(1):108-17.BJ

Abstract

Low vitamin D levels during pregnancy may account for reduced fetal growth and for altered neonatal development. The present study explored the association between maternal vitamin D status measured early in pregnancy and birth weight, prevalence of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants and postnatal growth (weight and length), as well as the potential role of vitamin D status in explaining ethnic disparities in these outcomes. Data were derived from a large multi-ethnic cohort in The Netherlands (Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD) cohort), and included 3730 women with live-born singleton term deliveries. Maternal serum vitamin D was measured during early pregnancy (median 13 weeks, interquartile range: 12-14), and was labelled 'deficient' (<or= 29.9 nmol/l), 'insufficient' (30-49.9 nmol/l) or 'adequate' (>or= 50 nmol/l). Six ethnic groups were distinguished: Dutch, Surinamese, Turkish, Moroccan, other non-Western and other Western. Associations with neonatal outcomes were analysed using multivariate regression analyses. Results showed that compared with women with adequate vitamin D levels, women with deficient vitamin D levels had infants with lower birth weights (- 114.4 g, 95 % CI - 151.2, - 77.6) and a higher risk of SGA (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.9, 3.2). Neonates born to mothers with a deficient vitamin D status showed accelerated growth in weight and length during the first year of life. Although a deficient vitamin D status influenced birth weight, SGA risk and neonatal growth, it played a limited role in explaining ethnic differences. Although vitamin D supplementation might be beneficial to those at risk of a deficient vitamin D status, more research is needed before a nationwide policy on the subject can be justified.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Health Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20193097

Citation

Leffelaar, Evelien R., et al. "Maternal Early Pregnancy Vitamin D Status in Relation to Fetal and Neonatal Growth: Results of the Multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and Their Development Cohort." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 104, no. 1, 2010, pp. 108-17.
Leffelaar ER, Vrijkotte TG, van Eijsden M. Maternal early pregnancy vitamin D status in relation to fetal and neonatal growth: results of the multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort. Br J Nutr. 2010;104(1):108-17.
Leffelaar, E. R., Vrijkotte, T. G., & van Eijsden, M. (2010). Maternal early pregnancy vitamin D status in relation to fetal and neonatal growth: results of the multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort. The British Journal of Nutrition, 104(1), 108-17. https://doi.org/10.1017/S000711451000022X
Leffelaar ER, Vrijkotte TG, van Eijsden M. Maternal Early Pregnancy Vitamin D Status in Relation to Fetal and Neonatal Growth: Results of the Multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and Their Development Cohort. Br J Nutr. 2010;104(1):108-17. PubMed PMID: 20193097.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal early pregnancy vitamin D status in relation to fetal and neonatal growth: results of the multi-ethnic Amsterdam Born Children and their Development cohort. AU - Leffelaar,Evelien R, AU - Vrijkotte,Tanja G M, AU - van Eijsden,Manon, Y1 - 2010/03/02/ PY - 2010/3/3/entrez PY - 2010/3/3/pubmed PY - 2010/7/10/medline SP - 108 EP - 17 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 104 IS - 1 N2 - Low vitamin D levels during pregnancy may account for reduced fetal growth and for altered neonatal development. The present study explored the association between maternal vitamin D status measured early in pregnancy and birth weight, prevalence of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants and postnatal growth (weight and length), as well as the potential role of vitamin D status in explaining ethnic disparities in these outcomes. Data were derived from a large multi-ethnic cohort in The Netherlands (Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD) cohort), and included 3730 women with live-born singleton term deliveries. Maternal serum vitamin D was measured during early pregnancy (median 13 weeks, interquartile range: 12-14), and was labelled 'deficient' (<or= 29.9 nmol/l), 'insufficient' (30-49.9 nmol/l) or 'adequate' (>or= 50 nmol/l). Six ethnic groups were distinguished: Dutch, Surinamese, Turkish, Moroccan, other non-Western and other Western. Associations with neonatal outcomes were analysed using multivariate regression analyses. Results showed that compared with women with adequate vitamin D levels, women with deficient vitamin D levels had infants with lower birth weights (- 114.4 g, 95 % CI - 151.2, - 77.6) and a higher risk of SGA (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.9, 3.2). Neonates born to mothers with a deficient vitamin D status showed accelerated growth in weight and length during the first year of life. Although a deficient vitamin D status influenced birth weight, SGA risk and neonatal growth, it played a limited role in explaining ethnic differences. Although vitamin D supplementation might be beneficial to those at risk of a deficient vitamin D status, more research is needed before a nationwide policy on the subject can be justified. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20193097/Maternal_early_pregnancy_vitamin_D_status_in_relation_to_fetal_and_neonatal_growth:_results_of_the_multi_ethnic_Amsterdam_Born_Children_and_their_Development_cohort_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S000711451000022X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -