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Influences on child fruit and vegetable intake: sociodemographic, parental and child factors in a longitudinal cohort study.
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jul; 13(7):1122-30.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the sociodemographic, parental and child factors that predict fruit and vegetable consumption in 7-year-old children.

DESIGN

Diet was assessed using three 1d unweighed food diaries. The child's daily fruit and vegetable consumption was calculated by summing the weight of each type of fruit, fruit juice and vegetable consumed. The various others factors measured were assessed by a questionnaire at different time points.

SETTING

The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

SUBJECTS

A total of 7285 children aged 7 years residing in the south-west of England during 1999-2000.

RESULTS

Median daily fruit and vegetable consumption (201 g) was below the recommendations for this age group (320 g). Girls ate more fruit and vegetables per unit energy (30.3 g/MJ) than boys (26.7 g/MJ; P =< 0.001). The predictors of fruit and vegetable consumption were mostly similar. Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with maternal consumption, maternal education status and parental rules about serving fruit/vegetables every day, food expenditure per person and whether the child was choosy about food. Vegetable consumption was also associated with the other characteristics of the child, such as whether the child enjoyed food and whether the child tried a variety of foods.

CONCLUSIONS

Children are not eating recommended amounts of fruit and vegetables, particularly boys. Consumption of fruit and vegetables appears to be influenced by parental rules about daily consumption and parental consumption and by the child's choosiness. Parent's actions could influence this. These findings may prove useful for those planning healthy eating campaigns for children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20196909

Citation

Jones, Louise R., et al. "Influences On Child Fruit and Vegetable Intake: Sociodemographic, Parental and Child Factors in a Longitudinal Cohort Study." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 13, no. 7, 2010, pp. 1122-30.
Jones LR, Steer CD, Rogers IS, et al. Influences on child fruit and vegetable intake: sociodemographic, parental and child factors in a longitudinal cohort study. Public Health Nutr. 2010;13(7):1122-30.
Jones, L. R., Steer, C. D., Rogers, I. S., & Emmett, P. M. (2010). Influences on child fruit and vegetable intake: sociodemographic, parental and child factors in a longitudinal cohort study. Public Health Nutrition, 13(7), 1122-30. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980010000133
Jones LR, et al. Influences On Child Fruit and Vegetable Intake: Sociodemographic, Parental and Child Factors in a Longitudinal Cohort Study. Public Health Nutr. 2010;13(7):1122-30. PubMed PMID: 20196909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influences on child fruit and vegetable intake: sociodemographic, parental and child factors in a longitudinal cohort study. AU - Jones,Louise R, AU - Steer,Colin D, AU - Rogers,Imogen S, AU - Emmett,Pauline M, Y1 - 2010/03/03/ PY - 2010/3/4/entrez PY - 2010/3/4/pubmed PY - 2010/9/3/medline SP - 1122 EP - 30 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 13 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the sociodemographic, parental and child factors that predict fruit and vegetable consumption in 7-year-old children. DESIGN: Diet was assessed using three 1d unweighed food diaries. The child's daily fruit and vegetable consumption was calculated by summing the weight of each type of fruit, fruit juice and vegetable consumed. The various others factors measured were assessed by a questionnaire at different time points. SETTING: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). SUBJECTS: A total of 7285 children aged 7 years residing in the south-west of England during 1999-2000. RESULTS: Median daily fruit and vegetable consumption (201 g) was below the recommendations for this age group (320 g). Girls ate more fruit and vegetables per unit energy (30.3 g/MJ) than boys (26.7 g/MJ; P =< 0.001). The predictors of fruit and vegetable consumption were mostly similar. Fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with maternal consumption, maternal education status and parental rules about serving fruit/vegetables every day, food expenditure per person and whether the child was choosy about food. Vegetable consumption was also associated with the other characteristics of the child, such as whether the child enjoyed food and whether the child tried a variety of foods. CONCLUSIONS: Children are not eating recommended amounts of fruit and vegetables, particularly boys. Consumption of fruit and vegetables appears to be influenced by parental rules about daily consumption and parental consumption and by the child's choosiness. Parent's actions could influence this. These findings may prove useful for those planning healthy eating campaigns for children. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20196909/Influences_on_child_fruit_and_vegetable_intake:_sociodemographic_parental_and_child_factors_in_a_longitudinal_cohort_study_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980010000133/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -