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Adolescent diet in relation to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although the association between adult diet and breast cancer has been investigated extensively, large prospective studies have generally not shown a direct link between intakes of carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and other nutrients and risk of breast cancer. Adolescence may be a period of increased susceptibility to risk factors that predispose to breast cancer. Dietary risk factors could therefore be more important during early life than later in adulthood.

METHODS

This is a prospective observational study of 39,268 premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II who completed a 124-item food frequency questionnaire on their diet during high school (HS-FFQ) in 1998, at which time participants were 34 to 53 years of age. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks and 95% CIs.

RESULTS

Four hundred fifty-five incident cases of invasive breast cancer were diagnosed between 1998 and 2005. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of intake, the relative risk of breast cancer in the highest quintile of adolescent total fat consumption was 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.81). Adolescent consumption of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, and trans fats was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Total dairy, milk, carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, glycemic load, and fiber consumed during adolescence were not significantly related to breast cancer incidence.

CONCLUSION

Dietary fat consumed during adolescence may be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. Further studies to assess this relationship among postmenopausal women, and confirm these results in premenopausal women, are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health and Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford University Outpatient Center, 450 Broadway St., Pavillion C Second Floor, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. linos@stanford.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20200427

Citation

Linos, Eleni, et al. "Adolescent Diet in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk Among Premenopausal Women." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 19, no. 3, 2010, pp. 689-96.
Linos E, Willett WC, Cho E, et al. Adolescent diet in relation to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010;19(3):689-96.
Linos, E., Willett, W. C., Cho, E., & Frazier, L. (2010). Adolescent diet in relation to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 19(3), pp. 689-96. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0802.
Linos E, et al. Adolescent Diet in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk Among Premenopausal Women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010;19(3):689-96. PubMed PMID: 20200427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adolescent diet in relation to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. AU - Linos,Eleni, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Cho,Eunyoung, AU - Frazier,Lindsay, Y1 - 2010/03/03/ PY - 2010/3/5/entrez PY - 2010/3/5/pubmed PY - 2010/6/15/medline SP - 689 EP - 96 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although the association between adult diet and breast cancer has been investigated extensively, large prospective studies have generally not shown a direct link between intakes of carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and other nutrients and risk of breast cancer. Adolescence may be a period of increased susceptibility to risk factors that predispose to breast cancer. Dietary risk factors could therefore be more important during early life than later in adulthood. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of 39,268 premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II who completed a 124-item food frequency questionnaire on their diet during high school (HS-FFQ) in 1998, at which time participants were 34 to 53 years of age. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks and 95% CIs. RESULTS: Four hundred fifty-five incident cases of invasive breast cancer were diagnosed between 1998 and 2005. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of intake, the relative risk of breast cancer in the highest quintile of adolescent total fat consumption was 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.81). Adolescent consumption of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, and trans fats was not significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Total dairy, milk, carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, glycemic load, and fiber consumed during adolescence were not significantly related to breast cancer incidence. CONCLUSION: Dietary fat consumed during adolescence may be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. Further studies to assess this relationship among postmenopausal women, and confirm these results in premenopausal women, are needed. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20200427/Adolescent_diet_in_relation_to_breast_cancer_risk_among_premenopausal_women_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20200427 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -