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Medical complications among hospitalizations for ischemic stroke in the United States from 1998 to 2007.
Stroke. 2010 May; 41(5):980-6.S

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

The common medical complications after ischemic stroke are associated with increased mortality and resource use.

METHOD

The study population consisted of 1 150 336 adult hospitalizations with ischemic stroke as a primary diagnosis included in the 1998 to 2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine changes between 1998 to 1999 and 2006 to 2007 in the prevalence of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or urinary tract infection, in-hospital mortality, and length of stay.

RESULTS

In 2006 to 2007, the prevalence of hospitalizations with a secondary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and urinary tract infection was 1.6%, 2.9%, 0.8%, 0.3%, and 10.1%, respectively. The adjusted ORs for a hospitalization in 2006 to 2007 complicated by acute myocardial infarction, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or urinary tract infection, using 1998 to 1999 as the referent, were 1.39, 1.68, 2.39, and 1.18, respectively. The odds of pneumonia did not change significantly between 1998 to 1999 and 2006 to 2007. In-hospital mortality was significantly lower in 2006 to 2007 than in 1998 to 1999. Despite the overall length of stay decreasing significantly from 1998 to 1999 to 2006 to 2007, it remained the same for hospitalizations with acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism.

CONCLUSIONS

Although in-hospital mortality decreased over the study period, 4 of the 5 complications were more common in 2006 to 2007 than they were 8 years earlier with the largest increase observed for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, 4770 Buford Highway, MS-K47, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20203317

Citation

Tong, Xin, et al. "Medical Complications Among Hospitalizations for Ischemic Stroke in the United States From 1998 to 2007." Stroke, vol. 41, no. 5, 2010, pp. 980-6.
Tong X, Kuklina EV, Gillespie C, et al. Medical complications among hospitalizations for ischemic stroke in the United States from 1998 to 2007. Stroke. 2010;41(5):980-6.
Tong, X., Kuklina, E. V., Gillespie, C., & George, M. G. (2010). Medical complications among hospitalizations for ischemic stroke in the United States from 1998 to 2007. Stroke, 41(5), 980-6. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.578674
Tong X, et al. Medical Complications Among Hospitalizations for Ischemic Stroke in the United States From 1998 to 2007. Stroke. 2010;41(5):980-6. PubMed PMID: 20203317.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medical complications among hospitalizations for ischemic stroke in the United States from 1998 to 2007. AU - Tong,Xin, AU - Kuklina,Elena V, AU - Gillespie,Cathleen, AU - George,Mary G, Y1 - 2010/03/04/ PY - 2010/3/6/entrez PY - 2010/3/6/pubmed PY - 2010/5/19/medline SP - 980 EP - 6 JF - Stroke JO - Stroke VL - 41 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The common medical complications after ischemic stroke are associated with increased mortality and resource use. METHOD: The study population consisted of 1 150 336 adult hospitalizations with ischemic stroke as a primary diagnosis included in the 1998 to 2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine changes between 1998 to 1999 and 2006 to 2007 in the prevalence of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or urinary tract infection, in-hospital mortality, and length of stay. RESULTS: In 2006 to 2007, the prevalence of hospitalizations with a secondary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and urinary tract infection was 1.6%, 2.9%, 0.8%, 0.3%, and 10.1%, respectively. The adjusted ORs for a hospitalization in 2006 to 2007 complicated by acute myocardial infarction, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or urinary tract infection, using 1998 to 1999 as the referent, were 1.39, 1.68, 2.39, and 1.18, respectively. The odds of pneumonia did not change significantly between 1998 to 1999 and 2006 to 2007. In-hospital mortality was significantly lower in 2006 to 2007 than in 1998 to 1999. Despite the overall length of stay decreasing significantly from 1998 to 1999 to 2006 to 2007, it remained the same for hospitalizations with acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. CONCLUSIONS: Although in-hospital mortality decreased over the study period, 4 of the 5 complications were more common in 2006 to 2007 than they were 8 years earlier with the largest increase observed for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. SN - 1524-4628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20203317/Medical_complications_among_hospitalizations_for_ischemic_stroke_in_the_United_States_from_1998_to_2007_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.578674?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -