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FLOTAC: new multivalent techniques for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic diagnosis of parasites in animals and humans.
Nat Protoc. 2010 Mar; 5(3):503-15.NP

Abstract

Accurate diagnosis of parasitic infections is of pivotal importance for both individual patient management and population-based studies, such as drug efficacy trials and surveillance of parasitic disease control and elimination programs, in both human and veterinary public health. In this study, we present protocols for the FLOTAC basic, dual and double techniques, which are promising new multivalent, sensitive, accurate and precise methods for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic analysis. These various methods make use of the FLOTAC apparatus, a cylindrical device with two 5-ml flotation chambers, which allows up to 1 g of stool to be prepared for microscopic analysis. Compared with currently more widely used diagnostic methods for parasite detection in animals (e.g., McMaster and Wisconsin techniques) and humans (e.g., Kato-Katz and ether-based concentration techniques), the FLOTAC techniques show higher sensitivity and accuracy. All FLOTAC techniques can be performed on fresh fecal material as well as preserved stool samples, and require approximately 12-15 min of preparation time before microscopic analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples Federico II, CREMOPAR Regione Campania, Naples, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20203667

Citation

Cringoli, Giuseppe, et al. "FLOTAC: New Multivalent Techniques for Qualitative and Quantitative Copromicroscopic Diagnosis of Parasites in Animals and Humans." Nature Protocols, vol. 5, no. 3, 2010, pp. 503-15.
Cringoli G, Rinaldi L, Maurelli MP, et al. FLOTAC: new multivalent techniques for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic diagnosis of parasites in animals and humans. Nat Protoc. 2010;5(3):503-15.
Cringoli, G., Rinaldi, L., Maurelli, M. P., & Utzinger, J. (2010). FLOTAC: new multivalent techniques for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic diagnosis of parasites in animals and humans. Nature Protocols, 5(3), 503-15. https://doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2009.235
Cringoli G, et al. FLOTAC: New Multivalent Techniques for Qualitative and Quantitative Copromicroscopic Diagnosis of Parasites in Animals and Humans. Nat Protoc. 2010;5(3):503-15. PubMed PMID: 20203667.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - FLOTAC: new multivalent techniques for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic diagnosis of parasites in animals and humans. AU - Cringoli,Giuseppe, AU - Rinaldi,Laura, AU - Maurelli,Maria Paola, AU - Utzinger,Jürg, Y1 - 2010/02/25/ PY - 2010/3/6/entrez PY - 2010/3/6/pubmed PY - 2010/6/4/medline SP - 503 EP - 15 JF - Nature protocols JO - Nat Protoc VL - 5 IS - 3 N2 - Accurate diagnosis of parasitic infections is of pivotal importance for both individual patient management and population-based studies, such as drug efficacy trials and surveillance of parasitic disease control and elimination programs, in both human and veterinary public health. In this study, we present protocols for the FLOTAC basic, dual and double techniques, which are promising new multivalent, sensitive, accurate and precise methods for qualitative and quantitative copromicroscopic analysis. These various methods make use of the FLOTAC apparatus, a cylindrical device with two 5-ml flotation chambers, which allows up to 1 g of stool to be prepared for microscopic analysis. Compared with currently more widely used diagnostic methods for parasite detection in animals (e.g., McMaster and Wisconsin techniques) and humans (e.g., Kato-Katz and ether-based concentration techniques), the FLOTAC techniques show higher sensitivity and accuracy. All FLOTAC techniques can be performed on fresh fecal material as well as preserved stool samples, and require approximately 12-15 min of preparation time before microscopic analysis. SN - 1750-2799 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20203667/FLOTAC:_new_multivalent_techniques_for_qualitative_and_quantitative_copromicroscopic_diagnosis_of_parasites_in_animals_and_humans_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2009.235 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -