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Serum vitamin D metabolites and bone mineralization in young children with chronic low to moderate lead exposure.
Pediatrics 1991; 87(5):680-7Ped

Abstract

One hundred five children (49 male, 99 black) with known lead exposure indices from birth and adequate nutrient intake of calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D were studied at 1 of 3 ages (21, 27, or 33 months) to determine the effects of chronic low to moderate lead exposure on circulating concentrations of vitamin D metabolites and bone mineral content as determined by photon absorptiometry. Univariate multiple regression analyses showed no direct relationship of blood lead levels to vitamin D metabolites or bone mineral content. Structural equation analyses which took into account potential covariates of age, season, race, and sex showed estimated declines in serum concentrations of total calcium (from 9.72 to 9.61 mg/dL), phosphorus (from 5.4 to 4.67 mg/dL), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (from 27.24 to 25.8 ng/mL) and estimated increases in concentrations of parathyroid hormones (from 73.03 to 83.14 microL Eq/mL), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (from 62.39 to 62.69 pg/mL), and bone mineral content (from 222.66 to 234.91 mg/cm) over the observed range of average lifetime blood lead concentrations (4.76 to 23.61 micrograms/dL, geometric mean 9.74 micrograms/dL). However, the only statistically significant effect of average lifetime blood lead concentration was that for phosphorus, and the multivariate test of the combined effects of lead on these six outcomes was not statistically significant (P = .2). It is concluded that significant alterations in vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and bone mineral content are not present in children whose nutritional status is adequate and who experience low to moderate lead exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neonatology, University of Cincinnati, Ohio.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2020514

Citation

Koo, W W., et al. "Serum Vitamin D Metabolites and Bone Mineralization in Young Children With Chronic Low to Moderate Lead Exposure." Pediatrics, vol. 87, no. 5, 1991, pp. 680-7.
Koo WW, Succop PA, Bornschein RL, et al. Serum vitamin D metabolites and bone mineralization in young children with chronic low to moderate lead exposure. Pediatrics. 1991;87(5):680-7.
Koo, W. W., Succop, P. A., Bornschein, R. L., Krug-Wispe, S. K., Steinchen, J. J., Tsang, R. C., & Berger, O. G. (1991). Serum vitamin D metabolites and bone mineralization in young children with chronic low to moderate lead exposure. Pediatrics, 87(5), pp. 680-7.
Koo WW, et al. Serum Vitamin D Metabolites and Bone Mineralization in Young Children With Chronic Low to Moderate Lead Exposure. Pediatrics. 1991;87(5):680-7. PubMed PMID: 2020514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum vitamin D metabolites and bone mineralization in young children with chronic low to moderate lead exposure. AU - Koo,W W, AU - Succop,P A, AU - Bornschein,R L, AU - Krug-Wispe,S K, AU - Steinchen,J J, AU - Tsang,R C, AU - Berger,O G, PY - 1991/5/1/pubmed PY - 1991/5/1/medline PY - 1991/5/1/entrez SP - 680 EP - 7 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 87 IS - 5 N2 - One hundred five children (49 male, 99 black) with known lead exposure indices from birth and adequate nutrient intake of calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D were studied at 1 of 3 ages (21, 27, or 33 months) to determine the effects of chronic low to moderate lead exposure on circulating concentrations of vitamin D metabolites and bone mineral content as determined by photon absorptiometry. Univariate multiple regression analyses showed no direct relationship of blood lead levels to vitamin D metabolites or bone mineral content. Structural equation analyses which took into account potential covariates of age, season, race, and sex showed estimated declines in serum concentrations of total calcium (from 9.72 to 9.61 mg/dL), phosphorus (from 5.4 to 4.67 mg/dL), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (from 27.24 to 25.8 ng/mL) and estimated increases in concentrations of parathyroid hormones (from 73.03 to 83.14 microL Eq/mL), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (from 62.39 to 62.69 pg/mL), and bone mineral content (from 222.66 to 234.91 mg/cm) over the observed range of average lifetime blood lead concentrations (4.76 to 23.61 micrograms/dL, geometric mean 9.74 micrograms/dL). However, the only statistically significant effect of average lifetime blood lead concentration was that for phosphorus, and the multivariate test of the combined effects of lead on these six outcomes was not statistically significant (P = .2). It is concluded that significant alterations in vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, and bone mineral content are not present in children whose nutritional status is adequate and who experience low to moderate lead exposure. SN - 0031-4005 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2020514/Serum_vitamin_D_metabolites_and_bone_mineralization_in_young_children_with_chronic_low_to_moderate_lead_exposure_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=2020514 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -