Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Increased apolipoprotein E level and reduced high-density lipoprotein mean particle size associate with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and features of metabolic syndrome.
Metabolism. 2010 Oct; 59(10):1502-9.M

Abstract

The metabolic syndrome (MetS) pandemic predisposes patients to low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). To successfully treat low HDL-C, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the changes in HDL particles in the low-HDL-C state. Especially, apolipoprotein (apo) E metabolism in HDL particles is an emerging and important issue. Therefore, we determined HDL subspecies, apo E distribution, and the impact of the MetS in subjects with low and high HDL-C. We studied 246 subjects derived from the Finnish Health 2000 Health Examination Survey. The 2 groups included 113 low-HDL-C (≤10th percentile) and 133 high-HDL-C (≥90th percentile) subjects. The low-HDL-C subjects had higher apo E concentration (39.4 ± 19.4 vs 25.6 ± 8.0 μg/mL, P < .001) and smaller HDL mean particle size (9.0 ± 0.2 vs 9.8 ± 0.3 nm, P < .001). The distribution of apo E genetic isoforms could not explain the difference. Apolipoprotein E content of very low-density lipoprotein particles was comparable between the study groups. In the low-HDL-C subjects, apo E level in large HDL particles was lower (P < .001) compared with that in the high-HDL-C subjects. The subjects with MetS had smaller HDL mean particle size and higher serum apo E concentration. Serum apo E concentration associated positively with different MetS markers (waist circumference, triglycerides, and glucose), whereas HDL mean particle size associated with those negatively. Our results highlight that, in the low-HDL-C state, there are changes in the size and composition of HDL particles associating with MetS. Apolipoprotein E, although generally considered antiatherogenic, associates with MetS and low HDL-C. Our results emphasize the need for a better understanding of apo E metabolism in HDL particles.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Biomedicum, Helsinki, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20206948

Citation

Söderlund, Sanni, et al. "Increased Apolipoprotein E Level and Reduced High-density Lipoprotein Mean Particle Size Associate With Low High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Features of Metabolic Syndrome." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 59, no. 10, 2010, pp. 1502-9.
Söderlund S, Watanabe H, Ehnholm C, et al. Increased apolipoprotein E level and reduced high-density lipoprotein mean particle size associate with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and features of metabolic syndrome. Metabolism. 2010;59(10):1502-9.
Söderlund, S., Watanabe, H., Ehnholm, C., Jauhiainen, M., & Taskinen, M. R. (2010). Increased apolipoprotein E level and reduced high-density lipoprotein mean particle size associate with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and features of metabolic syndrome. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 59(10), 1502-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2010.01.015
Söderlund S, et al. Increased Apolipoprotein E Level and Reduced High-density Lipoprotein Mean Particle Size Associate With Low High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Features of Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolism. 2010;59(10):1502-9. PubMed PMID: 20206948.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased apolipoprotein E level and reduced high-density lipoprotein mean particle size associate with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and features of metabolic syndrome. AU - Söderlund,Sanni, AU - Watanabe,Hiroshi, AU - Ehnholm,Christian, AU - Jauhiainen,Matti, AU - Taskinen,Marja-Riitta, Y1 - 2010/03/06/ PY - 2009/06/26/received PY - 2010/01/12/revised PY - 2010/01/21/accepted PY - 2010/3/9/entrez PY - 2010/3/9/pubmed PY - 2010/10/28/medline SP - 1502 EP - 9 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 59 IS - 10 N2 - The metabolic syndrome (MetS) pandemic predisposes patients to low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). To successfully treat low HDL-C, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the changes in HDL particles in the low-HDL-C state. Especially, apolipoprotein (apo) E metabolism in HDL particles is an emerging and important issue. Therefore, we determined HDL subspecies, apo E distribution, and the impact of the MetS in subjects with low and high HDL-C. We studied 246 subjects derived from the Finnish Health 2000 Health Examination Survey. The 2 groups included 113 low-HDL-C (≤10th percentile) and 133 high-HDL-C (≥90th percentile) subjects. The low-HDL-C subjects had higher apo E concentration (39.4 ± 19.4 vs 25.6 ± 8.0 μg/mL, P < .001) and smaller HDL mean particle size (9.0 ± 0.2 vs 9.8 ± 0.3 nm, P < .001). The distribution of apo E genetic isoforms could not explain the difference. Apolipoprotein E content of very low-density lipoprotein particles was comparable between the study groups. In the low-HDL-C subjects, apo E level in large HDL particles was lower (P < .001) compared with that in the high-HDL-C subjects. The subjects with MetS had smaller HDL mean particle size and higher serum apo E concentration. Serum apo E concentration associated positively with different MetS markers (waist circumference, triglycerides, and glucose), whereas HDL mean particle size associated with those negatively. Our results highlight that, in the low-HDL-C state, there are changes in the size and composition of HDL particles associating with MetS. Apolipoprotein E, although generally considered antiatherogenic, associates with MetS and low HDL-C. Our results emphasize the need for a better understanding of apo E metabolism in HDL particles. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20206948/Increased_apolipoprotein_E_level_and_reduced_high_density_lipoprotein_mean_particle_size_associate_with_low_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_and_features_of_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(10)00030-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -