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Alcohol consumption, weight gain, and risk of becoming overweight in middle-aged and older women.
Arch Intern Med. 2010 Mar 08; 170(5):453-61.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The obesity epidemic is a major health problem in the United States. Alcohol consumption is a source of energy intake that may contribute to body weight gain and development of obesity. However, previous studies of this relationship have been limited, with inconsistent results.

METHODS

We conducted a prospective cohort study among 19 220 US women aged 38.9 years or older who were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes mellitus and had a baseline body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) within the normal range of 18.5 to less than 25. Alcoholic beverage consumption was reported on a baseline questionnaire. Body weight was self-reported on baseline and 8 annual follow-up questionnaires.

RESULTS

There was an inverse association between amount of alcohol consumed at baseline and weight gained during 12.9 years of follow-up. A total of 7942 (41.3%) initially normal-weight women became overweight or obese (BMI > or =25) and 732 (3.8%) became obese (BMI > or =30). After adjusting for age, baseline BMI, smoking status, nonalcohol energy intake, physical activity level, and other lifestyle and dietary factors, the relative risks of becoming overweight or obese across total alcohol intake of 0, more than 0 to less than 5, 5 to less than 15, 15 to less than 30, and 30 g/d or more were 1.00, 0.96, 0.86, 0.70, and 0.73, respectively (P()for trend()<.001). The corresponding relative risks of becoming obese were 1.00, 0.75, 0.43, 0.39, and 0.29 (P()for trend()<.001). The associations were similar by subgroups of age, smoking status, physical activity level, and baseline BMI.

CONCLUSION

Compared with nondrinkers, initially normal-weight women who consumed a light to moderate amount of alcohol gained less weight and had a lower risk of becoming overweight and/or obese during 12.9 years of follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02215, USA. luwang@rics.bwh.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20212182

Citation

Wang, Lu, et al. "Alcohol Consumption, Weight Gain, and Risk of Becoming Overweight in Middle-aged and Older Women." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 170, no. 5, 2010, pp. 453-61.
Wang L, Lee IM, Manson JE, et al. Alcohol consumption, weight gain, and risk of becoming overweight in middle-aged and older women. Arch Intern Med. 2010;170(5):453-61.
Wang, L., Lee, I. M., Manson, J. E., Buring, J. E., & Sesso, H. D. (2010). Alcohol consumption, weight gain, and risk of becoming overweight in middle-aged and older women. Archives of Internal Medicine, 170(5), 453-61. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinternmed.2009.527
Wang L, et al. Alcohol Consumption, Weight Gain, and Risk of Becoming Overweight in Middle-aged and Older Women. Arch Intern Med. 2010 Mar 8;170(5):453-61. PubMed PMID: 20212182.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption, weight gain, and risk of becoming overweight in middle-aged and older women. AU - Wang,Lu, AU - Lee,I-Min, AU - Manson,JoAnn E, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Sesso,Howard D, PY - 2010/3/10/entrez PY - 2010/3/10/pubmed PY - 2010/4/7/medline SP - 453 EP - 61 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 170 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The obesity epidemic is a major health problem in the United States. Alcohol consumption is a source of energy intake that may contribute to body weight gain and development of obesity. However, previous studies of this relationship have been limited, with inconsistent results. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study among 19 220 US women aged 38.9 years or older who were free of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes mellitus and had a baseline body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) within the normal range of 18.5 to less than 25. Alcoholic beverage consumption was reported on a baseline questionnaire. Body weight was self-reported on baseline and 8 annual follow-up questionnaires. RESULTS: There was an inverse association between amount of alcohol consumed at baseline and weight gained during 12.9 years of follow-up. A total of 7942 (41.3%) initially normal-weight women became overweight or obese (BMI > or =25) and 732 (3.8%) became obese (BMI > or =30). After adjusting for age, baseline BMI, smoking status, nonalcohol energy intake, physical activity level, and other lifestyle and dietary factors, the relative risks of becoming overweight or obese across total alcohol intake of 0, more than 0 to less than 5, 5 to less than 15, 15 to less than 30, and 30 g/d or more were 1.00, 0.96, 0.86, 0.70, and 0.73, respectively (P()for trend()<.001). The corresponding relative risks of becoming obese were 1.00, 0.75, 0.43, 0.39, and 0.29 (P()for trend()<.001). The associations were similar by subgroups of age, smoking status, physical activity level, and baseline BMI. CONCLUSION: Compared with nondrinkers, initially normal-weight women who consumed a light to moderate amount of alcohol gained less weight and had a lower risk of becoming overweight and/or obese during 12.9 years of follow-up. SN - 1538-3679 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20212182/Alcohol_consumption_weight_gain_and_risk_of_becoming_overweight_in_middle_aged_and_older_women_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/10.1001/archinternmed.2009.527 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -