Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Kinetics of ethanol decay in mouth- and nose-exhaled breath measured on-line by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry following varying doses of alcohol.
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2010 Apr 15; 24(7):1066-74.RC

Abstract

A study has been carried out of the decay of ethanol in mouth-exhaled and nose-exhaled breath of two healthy volunteers following the ingestion of various doses of alcohol at different dilutions in water. Concurrent analyses of sequential single breath exhalations from the two volunteers were carried out using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, on-line and in real time continuously over some 200 min following each alcohol dose by simply switching sampling between the two volunteers. Thus, the time interval between breath exhalations was only a few minutes, and this results in well-defined decay curves. Inspection of the mouth-exhaled and nose-exhaled breath data shows that mouth contamination of ethanol diminished to insignificant levels after a few minutes. The detailed results of the analyses of nose-exhaled breath show that the peak levels and the decay rates of breath ethanol are dependent on the ethanol dose and the volume of ethanol/water mixture ingested. From these data, both the efficiency of the first-pass metabolism of ethanol and the indications of gastric emptying rates at the various doses and ingested volumes have been obtained for the two volunteers. Additionally and simultaneously, acetaldehyde, acetic acid and acetone were measured in each single breath exhalation. Acetaldehyde, the primary product of ethanol metabolism, is seen to track the breath ethanol. Acetic acid, a possible secondary product of this metabolism, was detected in the exhaled breath, but was shown to largely originate in the oral cavity. Breath acetone was seen to increase over the long period of measurement due to the depletion of nutrients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, School of Medicine, Keele University, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7QB, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20213689

Citation

Smith, David, et al. "Kinetics of Ethanol Decay in Mouth- and Nose-exhaled Breath Measured On-line By Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry Following Varying Doses of Alcohol." Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry : RCM, vol. 24, no. 7, 2010, pp. 1066-74.
Smith D, Pysanenko A, Spanel P. Kinetics of ethanol decay in mouth- and nose-exhaled breath measured on-line by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry following varying doses of alcohol. Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2010;24(7):1066-74.
Smith, D., Pysanenko, A., & Spanel, P. (2010). Kinetics of ethanol decay in mouth- and nose-exhaled breath measured on-line by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry following varying doses of alcohol. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry : RCM, 24(7), 1066-74. https://doi.org/10.1002/rcm.4481
Smith D, Pysanenko A, Spanel P. Kinetics of Ethanol Decay in Mouth- and Nose-exhaled Breath Measured On-line By Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry Following Varying Doses of Alcohol. Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2010 Apr 15;24(7):1066-74. PubMed PMID: 20213689.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Kinetics of ethanol decay in mouth- and nose-exhaled breath measured on-line by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry following varying doses of alcohol. AU - Smith,David, AU - Pysanenko,Andriy, AU - Spanel,Patrik, PY - 2010/3/10/entrez PY - 2010/3/10/pubmed PY - 2010/6/22/medline SP - 1066 EP - 74 JF - Rapid communications in mass spectrometry : RCM JO - Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom VL - 24 IS - 7 N2 - A study has been carried out of the decay of ethanol in mouth-exhaled and nose-exhaled breath of two healthy volunteers following the ingestion of various doses of alcohol at different dilutions in water. Concurrent analyses of sequential single breath exhalations from the two volunteers were carried out using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, on-line and in real time continuously over some 200 min following each alcohol dose by simply switching sampling between the two volunteers. Thus, the time interval between breath exhalations was only a few minutes, and this results in well-defined decay curves. Inspection of the mouth-exhaled and nose-exhaled breath data shows that mouth contamination of ethanol diminished to insignificant levels after a few minutes. The detailed results of the analyses of nose-exhaled breath show that the peak levels and the decay rates of breath ethanol are dependent on the ethanol dose and the volume of ethanol/water mixture ingested. From these data, both the efficiency of the first-pass metabolism of ethanol and the indications of gastric emptying rates at the various doses and ingested volumes have been obtained for the two volunteers. Additionally and simultaneously, acetaldehyde, acetic acid and acetone were measured in each single breath exhalation. Acetaldehyde, the primary product of ethanol metabolism, is seen to track the breath ethanol. Acetic acid, a possible secondary product of this metabolism, was detected in the exhaled breath, but was shown to largely originate in the oral cavity. Breath acetone was seen to increase over the long period of measurement due to the depletion of nutrients. SN - 1097-0231 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20213689/Kinetics_of_ethanol_decay_in_mouth__and_nose_exhaled_breath_measured_on_line_by_selected_ion_flow_tube_mass_spectrometry_following_varying_doses_of_alcohol_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/rcm.4481 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -