Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Absence of the anterior fontanelle due to a fontanellar bone.
J Craniofac Surg. 2010 Mar; 21(2):448-9.JC

Abstract

Improved accessibility to supraregional centers in the United Kingdom has led to an increased referral of minor craniofacial anomalies. We have recognized a group of patients referred with absence of the anterior fontanelle and possible associated craniosynostosis. The aim of this study was to assess the group of patients in which the anterior fontanelle was entirely replaced by a single bone, examining associations, relationship to craniosynostosis, and prognostic implications.Eleven patients had fontanellar bones replacing the anterior fontanelle on computed tomographic imaging in the 3-year study period. Five were referred solely because of absence of the anterior fontanelle; and the remainder, because of concern of concomitant craniosynostosis. Five children had associated craniosynostosis (sagittal synostosis, 3; metopic synostosis, 1; and bicoronal synostosis, 1), 1 had acrocallosal syndrome, and 5 had no other craniofacial abnormalities. The patient group with craniosynostosis have been managed in line with the unit protocol and have good early postoperative results (mean postoperative follow-up, 9.4 mo). The 5 patients who had an anterior fontanellar bone as an isolated finding were observed and have developed normally with a mean follow-up of 2 years 1.4 months (range, 8 mo to 3 y 4 mo).Replacement of the anterior fontanelle with a fontanellar bone is an uncommon finding, often associated with craniosynostosis. Cases with craniosynostosis can be treated in line with unit protocols. Isolated anterior fontanellar bones can be managed conservatively without adverse impact on the child.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oxford Craniofacial Unit, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20216454

Citation

Woods, Roger H., and David Johnson. "Absence of the Anterior Fontanelle Due to a Fontanellar Bone." The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, vol. 21, no. 2, 2010, pp. 448-9.
Woods RH, Johnson D. Absence of the anterior fontanelle due to a fontanellar bone. J Craniofac Surg. 2010;21(2):448-9.
Woods, R. H., & Johnson, D. (2010). Absence of the anterior fontanelle due to a fontanellar bone. The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 21(2), 448-9. https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e3181cfe970
Woods RH, Johnson D. Absence of the Anterior Fontanelle Due to a Fontanellar Bone. J Craniofac Surg. 2010;21(2):448-9. PubMed PMID: 20216454.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Absence of the anterior fontanelle due to a fontanellar bone. AU - Woods,Roger H, AU - Johnson,David, PY - 2010/3/11/entrez PY - 2010/3/11/pubmed PY - 2010/9/30/medline SP - 448 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of craniofacial surgery JO - J Craniofac Surg VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - Improved accessibility to supraregional centers in the United Kingdom has led to an increased referral of minor craniofacial anomalies. We have recognized a group of patients referred with absence of the anterior fontanelle and possible associated craniosynostosis. The aim of this study was to assess the group of patients in which the anterior fontanelle was entirely replaced by a single bone, examining associations, relationship to craniosynostosis, and prognostic implications.Eleven patients had fontanellar bones replacing the anterior fontanelle on computed tomographic imaging in the 3-year study period. Five were referred solely because of absence of the anterior fontanelle; and the remainder, because of concern of concomitant craniosynostosis. Five children had associated craniosynostosis (sagittal synostosis, 3; metopic synostosis, 1; and bicoronal synostosis, 1), 1 had acrocallosal syndrome, and 5 had no other craniofacial abnormalities. The patient group with craniosynostosis have been managed in line with the unit protocol and have good early postoperative results (mean postoperative follow-up, 9.4 mo). The 5 patients who had an anterior fontanellar bone as an isolated finding were observed and have developed normally with a mean follow-up of 2 years 1.4 months (range, 8 mo to 3 y 4 mo).Replacement of the anterior fontanelle with a fontanellar bone is an uncommon finding, often associated with craniosynostosis. Cases with craniosynostosis can be treated in line with unit protocols. Isolated anterior fontanellar bones can be managed conservatively without adverse impact on the child. SN - 1536-3732 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20216454/Absence_of_the_anterior_fontanelle_due_to_a_fontanellar_bone_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e3181cfe970 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -