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Selection of surrogate bacteria in place of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium for pulsed electric field treatment of orange juice.
Int J Food Microbiol. 2010 Apr 30; 139(1-2):1-8.IJ

Abstract

Pulsed electric field (PEF) technology has been used for the inactivation of microorganisms and to prevent flavor loss in liquid foods and beverages in place of thermal pasteurization. When used to pasteurize orange juice, PEF may prevent loss of volatile sensory attributes. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC), two strains of Salmonella Typhimurium, and twenty strains of non-pathogenic bacteria were screened for inactivation in orange juice by PEF at 22 and 20kV/cm at 45 and 55 degrees C, respectively. Higher populations of both salmonellae were inactivated (2.81 and 3.54 log CFU/ml) at 55 degrees C, in comparison with the reduction of EHEC (2.22 log). When tested under the same conditions, inactivation of EHEC was slightly greater than that of a non-pathogenic E. coli (NPEC) ATCC 35218 (2.02 log). NPEC was further tested as a surrogate for EHEC by comparing inactivation kinetics at 45, 50 and 55 degrees C at field strengths of between 7.86 and 32.55kV/cm. Statistical comparison of revealed that EHEC and NPEC inactivation curves were homogeneous at outlet temperatures of 45 and 50 degrees C; however, EHEC was slightly more sensitive to PEF than the surrogate NPEC at 55 degrees C. The higher PEF resistance of non-pathogenic E. coli 35218 at 55 degrees C may provide a desirable margin of safety when used in pilot plant challenge studies in place of E. coli O157:H7.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Safety Intervention Technologies Research Unit, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 19038-8551, United States. joshua.gurtler@ars.usda.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20223544

Citation

Gurtler, Joshua B., et al. "Selection of Surrogate Bacteria in Place of E. Coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium for Pulsed Electric Field Treatment of Orange Juice." International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 139, no. 1-2, 2010, pp. 1-8.
Gurtler JB, Rivera RB, Zhang HQ, et al. Selection of surrogate bacteria in place of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium for pulsed electric field treatment of orange juice. Int J Food Microbiol. 2010;139(1-2):1-8.
Gurtler, J. B., Rivera, R. B., Zhang, H. Q., & Geveke, D. J. (2010). Selection of surrogate bacteria in place of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium for pulsed electric field treatment of orange juice. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 139(1-2), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2010.02.023
Gurtler JB, et al. Selection of Surrogate Bacteria in Place of E. Coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium for Pulsed Electric Field Treatment of Orange Juice. Int J Food Microbiol. 2010 Apr 30;139(1-2):1-8. PubMed PMID: 20223544.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selection of surrogate bacteria in place of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium for pulsed electric field treatment of orange juice. AU - Gurtler,Joshua B, AU - Rivera,Rebecca B, AU - Zhang,Howard Q, AU - Geveke,David J, Y1 - 2010/02/23/ PY - 2009/09/04/received PY - 2010/02/12/revised PY - 2010/02/16/accepted PY - 2010/3/13/entrez PY - 2010/3/13/pubmed PY - 2010/8/24/medline SP - 1 EP - 8 JF - International journal of food microbiology JO - Int J Food Microbiol VL - 139 IS - 1-2 N2 - Pulsed electric field (PEF) technology has been used for the inactivation of microorganisms and to prevent flavor loss in liquid foods and beverages in place of thermal pasteurization. When used to pasteurize orange juice, PEF may prevent loss of volatile sensory attributes. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (EHEC), two strains of Salmonella Typhimurium, and twenty strains of non-pathogenic bacteria were screened for inactivation in orange juice by PEF at 22 and 20kV/cm at 45 and 55 degrees C, respectively. Higher populations of both salmonellae were inactivated (2.81 and 3.54 log CFU/ml) at 55 degrees C, in comparison with the reduction of EHEC (2.22 log). When tested under the same conditions, inactivation of EHEC was slightly greater than that of a non-pathogenic E. coli (NPEC) ATCC 35218 (2.02 log). NPEC was further tested as a surrogate for EHEC by comparing inactivation kinetics at 45, 50 and 55 degrees C at field strengths of between 7.86 and 32.55kV/cm. Statistical comparison of revealed that EHEC and NPEC inactivation curves were homogeneous at outlet temperatures of 45 and 50 degrees C; however, EHEC was slightly more sensitive to PEF than the surrogate NPEC at 55 degrees C. The higher PEF resistance of non-pathogenic E. coli 35218 at 55 degrees C may provide a desirable margin of safety when used in pilot plant challenge studies in place of E. coli O157:H7. SN - 1879-3460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20223544/Selection_of_surrogate_bacteria_in_place_of_E__coli_O157:H7_and_Salmonella_Typhimurium_for_pulsed_electric_field_treatment_of_orange_juice_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-1605(10)00104-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -