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Intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder among high-risk women: does pregnancy matter?
Violence Against Women. 2010 Apr; 16(4):426-43.VA

Abstract

Interviews from 655 women participating in the Chicago Women's Health Risk Study (CWHRS) were used to assess prevalence and factors associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Black women had the highest rate of IPV overall and among pregnant women, and had decreased odds of PTSD compared to Black nonpregnant women. Hispanic pregnant women, however, had decreased odds of IPV and PTSD compared to Hispanic nonpregnant women. Disparities in IPV by race/ ethnicity and pregnancy status complicate the study of IPV and PTSD and have implications for the public health community.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, VA 23219, USA. caroline.stampfel@vdh.virginia.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20224113

Citation

Stampfel, Caroline C., et al. "Intimate Partner Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among High-risk Women: Does Pregnancy Matter?" Violence Against Women, vol. 16, no. 4, 2010, pp. 426-43.
Stampfel CC, Chapman DA, Alvarez AE. Intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder among high-risk women: does pregnancy matter? Violence Against Women. 2010;16(4):426-43.
Stampfel, C. C., Chapman, D. A., & Alvarez, A. E. (2010). Intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder among high-risk women: does pregnancy matter? Violence Against Women, 16(4), 426-43. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077801210364047
Stampfel CC, Chapman DA, Alvarez AE. Intimate Partner Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among High-risk Women: Does Pregnancy Matter. Violence Against Women. 2010;16(4):426-43. PubMed PMID: 20224113.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence and posttraumatic stress disorder among high-risk women: does pregnancy matter? AU - Stampfel,Caroline C, AU - Chapman,Derek A, AU - Alvarez,Andrea E, PY - 2010/3/13/entrez PY - 2010/3/13/pubmed PY - 2010/6/24/medline SP - 426 EP - 43 JF - Violence against women JO - Violence Against Women VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - Interviews from 655 women participating in the Chicago Women's Health Risk Study (CWHRS) were used to assess prevalence and factors associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Black women had the highest rate of IPV overall and among pregnant women, and had decreased odds of PTSD compared to Black nonpregnant women. Hispanic pregnant women, however, had decreased odds of IPV and PTSD compared to Hispanic nonpregnant women. Disparities in IPV by race/ ethnicity and pregnancy status complicate the study of IPV and PTSD and have implications for the public health community. SN - 1552-8448 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20224113/Intimate_partner_violence_and_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_among_high_risk_women:_does_pregnancy_matter DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -