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Detection of phenolic glycolipid-I antigen and antibody in sera from new and relapsed lepromatous patients treated with various drug regimens.
Int J Lepr Other Mycobact Dis. 1991 Mar; 59(1):25-31.IJ

Abstract

Since phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) is an unequivocal marker of Mycobacterium leprae, the antigen has been a good candidate for the serodiagnosis and monitoring the effectiveness of leprosy chemotherapy. As an effort to define the kinetics of the PGL-I antigen and its antibodies in leprosy patients, this study was initiated to examine the serum specimens obtained serially from lepromatous patients under chemotherapy trials. PGL-I was detectable in 64 (94.1%) of 68 new lepromatous (bacterial index, BI = 3.2 to 5.8) and in 26 (78.8%) of 33 relapsed lepromatous patients (BI = 3.0 to 5.3). Meanwhile, virtually all of the new and relapsed patients were strongly seropositive to PGL-I. PGL-I was not detectable in any of the patients about 18 months after chemotherapy was initiated; however, anti-PGL-I reactivity declined by 50% at 2 years and by about 70% at 5 years after chemotherapy regardless of the drug regimens under study. Considering the rapid disappearance of the PGL-I antigen and steady decrease in anti-PGL-I IgM antibodies following chemotherapy, the PGL-I-based serology may be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of treatment, at both the early and late stages, in leprosy patients whose initial sera contain a significant level of PGL-I antigen or antibodies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2030314

Citation

Cho, S N., et al. "Detection of Phenolic glycolipid-I Antigen and Antibody in Sera From New and Relapsed Lepromatous Patients Treated With Various Drug Regimens." International Journal of Leprosy and Other Mycobacterial Diseases : Official Organ of the International Leprosy Association, vol. 59, no. 1, 1991, pp. 25-31.
Cho SN, Cellona RV, Fajardo TT, et al. Detection of phenolic glycolipid-I antigen and antibody in sera from new and relapsed lepromatous patients treated with various drug regimens. Int J Lepr Other Mycobact Dis. 1991;59(1):25-31.
Cho, S. N., Cellona, R. V., Fajardo, T. T., Abalos, R. M., dela Cruz, E. C., Walsh, G. P., Kim, J. D., & Brennan, P. J. (1991). Detection of phenolic glycolipid-I antigen and antibody in sera from new and relapsed lepromatous patients treated with various drug regimens. International Journal of Leprosy and Other Mycobacterial Diseases : Official Organ of the International Leprosy Association, 59(1), 25-31.
Cho SN, et al. Detection of Phenolic glycolipid-I Antigen and Antibody in Sera From New and Relapsed Lepromatous Patients Treated With Various Drug Regimens. Int J Lepr Other Mycobact Dis. 1991;59(1):25-31. PubMed PMID: 2030314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection of phenolic glycolipid-I antigen and antibody in sera from new and relapsed lepromatous patients treated with various drug regimens. AU - Cho,S N, AU - Cellona,R V, AU - Fajardo,T T,Jr AU - Abalos,R M, AU - dela Cruz,E C, AU - Walsh,G P, AU - Kim,J D, AU - Brennan,P J, PY - 1991/3/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1991/3/1/entrez SP - 25 EP - 31 JF - International journal of leprosy and other mycobacterial diseases : official organ of the International Leprosy Association JO - Int J Lepr Other Mycobact Dis VL - 59 IS - 1 N2 - Since phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) is an unequivocal marker of Mycobacterium leprae, the antigen has been a good candidate for the serodiagnosis and monitoring the effectiveness of leprosy chemotherapy. As an effort to define the kinetics of the PGL-I antigen and its antibodies in leprosy patients, this study was initiated to examine the serum specimens obtained serially from lepromatous patients under chemotherapy trials. PGL-I was detectable in 64 (94.1%) of 68 new lepromatous (bacterial index, BI = 3.2 to 5.8) and in 26 (78.8%) of 33 relapsed lepromatous patients (BI = 3.0 to 5.3). Meanwhile, virtually all of the new and relapsed patients were strongly seropositive to PGL-I. PGL-I was not detectable in any of the patients about 18 months after chemotherapy was initiated; however, anti-PGL-I reactivity declined by 50% at 2 years and by about 70% at 5 years after chemotherapy regardless of the drug regimens under study. Considering the rapid disappearance of the PGL-I antigen and steady decrease in anti-PGL-I IgM antibodies following chemotherapy, the PGL-I-based serology may be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of treatment, at both the early and late stages, in leprosy patients whose initial sera contain a significant level of PGL-I antigen or antibodies. SN - 0148-916X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2030314/Detection_of_phenolic_glycolipid_I_antigen_and_antibody_in_sera_from_new_and_relapsed_lepromatous_patients_treated_with_various_drug_regimens_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -