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Effects of alcohol on attention orienting and dual-task performance during simulated driving: an event-related potential study.
J Psychopharmacol. 2010 Sep; 24(9):1333-48.JP

Abstract

Driving is a complex task and is susceptible to inattention and distraction. Moreover, alcohol has a detrimental effect on driving performance, possibly due to alcohol-induced attention deficits. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of alcohol on simulated driving performance and attention orienting and allocation, as assessed by event-related potentials (ERPs). Thirty-two participants completed two test runs in the Divided Attention Steering Simulator (DASS) with blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) of 0.00%, 0.02%, 0.05%, 0.08% and 0.10%. Sixteen participants performed the second DASS test run with a passive auditory oddball to assess alcohol effects on involuntary attention shifting. Sixteen other participants performed the second DASS test run with an active auditory oddball to assess alcohol effects on dual-task performance and active attention allocation. Dose-dependent impairments were found for reaction times, the number of misses and steering error, even more so in dual-task conditions, especially in the active oddball group. ERP amplitudes to novel irrelevant events were also attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. The P3b amplitude to deviant target stimuli decreased with blood alcohol concentration only in the dual-task condition. It is concluded that alcohol increases distractibility and interference from secondary task stimuli, as well as reduces attentional capacity and dual-task integrality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychopharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. a.e.wester@uu.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20305040

Citation

Wester, Anne E., et al. "Effects of Alcohol On Attention Orienting and Dual-task Performance During Simulated Driving: an Event-related Potential Study." Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), vol. 24, no. 9, 2010, pp. 1333-48.
Wester AE, Verster JC, Volkerts ER, et al. Effects of alcohol on attention orienting and dual-task performance during simulated driving: an event-related potential study. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2010;24(9):1333-48.
Wester, A. E., Verster, J. C., Volkerts, E. R., Böcker, K. B., & Kenemans, J. L. (2010). Effects of alcohol on attention orienting and dual-task performance during simulated driving: an event-related potential study. Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), 24(9), 1333-48. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881109348168
Wester AE, et al. Effects of Alcohol On Attention Orienting and Dual-task Performance During Simulated Driving: an Event-related Potential Study. J Psychopharmacol (Oxford). 2010;24(9):1333-48. PubMed PMID: 20305040.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of alcohol on attention orienting and dual-task performance during simulated driving: an event-related potential study. AU - Wester,Anne E, AU - Verster,Joris C, AU - Volkerts,Edmund R, AU - Böcker,Koen B E, AU - Kenemans,J Leon, Y1 - 2010/03/19/ PY - 2010/3/23/entrez PY - 2010/3/23/pubmed PY - 2011/1/12/medline SP - 1333 EP - 48 JF - Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England) JO - J. Psychopharmacol. (Oxford) VL - 24 IS - 9 N2 - Driving is a complex task and is susceptible to inattention and distraction. Moreover, alcohol has a detrimental effect on driving performance, possibly due to alcohol-induced attention deficits. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of alcohol on simulated driving performance and attention orienting and allocation, as assessed by event-related potentials (ERPs). Thirty-two participants completed two test runs in the Divided Attention Steering Simulator (DASS) with blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) of 0.00%, 0.02%, 0.05%, 0.08% and 0.10%. Sixteen participants performed the second DASS test run with a passive auditory oddball to assess alcohol effects on involuntary attention shifting. Sixteen other participants performed the second DASS test run with an active auditory oddball to assess alcohol effects on dual-task performance and active attention allocation. Dose-dependent impairments were found for reaction times, the number of misses and steering error, even more so in dual-task conditions, especially in the active oddball group. ERP amplitudes to novel irrelevant events were also attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. The P3b amplitude to deviant target stimuli decreased with blood alcohol concentration only in the dual-task condition. It is concluded that alcohol increases distractibility and interference from secondary task stimuli, as well as reduces attentional capacity and dual-task integrality. SN - 1461-7285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20305040/Effects_of_alcohol_on_attention_orienting_and_dual_task_performance_during_simulated_driving:_an_event_related_potential_study_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0269881109348168?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -