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Parental attitudes about influenza immunization and school-based immunization for school-aged children.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010 Aug; 29(8):751-5.PI

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Identify parental beliefs and barriers related to influenza immunization of school-aged children and acceptance of school-based influenza immunization.

METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional survey of parents of elementary school-aged children in November 2008. Outcomes were receipt of influenza vaccine, acceptance of school-based immunization, and barriers to immunization.

RESULTS

Response rate was 65% (259/397). Parents reported that 26% of children had received the vaccine and 24% intended receipt. A total of 50% did not plan to immunize. Factors associated with receipt were belief that immunization is a social norm (adjusted odds ratios [AOR], 10.8; 95% CI, 2.8-41.8), belief in benefit (AOR, 7.8; CI, 1.8-33.8), discussion with a doctor (AOR, 7.0; CI, 2.9-16.8), and belief that vaccine is safe (AOR, 4.0; CI, 1.0-15.8). A total of 75% of parents would immunize their children at school if the vaccine were free, including 59% (76/129) who did not plan to immunize. Factors associated with acceptance of school-based immunization were belief in benefit (AOR, 6.1; 95% CI, 2.7-14.0), endorsement of medical setting barriers (AOR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.3-10.3), and beliefs that immunization is a social norm (AOR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.4-7.6) and that the child is susceptible to influenza (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7). Medical setting barriers were competing time demands, inconvenience, and cost; school barriers were parents' desire to be with children and competence of person delivering the vaccine.

CONCLUSIONS

School-based immunization programs can increase immunization coverage by targeting parents for whom time demands and inconvenience are barriers, demonstrating that immunization is a social norm, and addressing concerns about influenza vaccine benefit and safety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20308935

Citation

Allison, Mandy A., et al. "Parental Attitudes About Influenza Immunization and School-based Immunization for School-aged Children." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 29, no. 8, 2010, pp. 751-5.
Allison MA, Reyes M, Young P, et al. Parental attitudes about influenza immunization and school-based immunization for school-aged children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010;29(8):751-5.
Allison, M. A., Reyes, M., Young, P., Calame, L., Sheng, X., Weng, H. Y., & Byington, C. L. (2010). Parental attitudes about influenza immunization and school-based immunization for school-aged children. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 29(8), 751-5. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e3181d8562c
Allison MA, et al. Parental Attitudes About Influenza Immunization and School-based Immunization for School-aged Children. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2010;29(8):751-5. PubMed PMID: 20308935.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental attitudes about influenza immunization and school-based immunization for school-aged children. AU - Allison,Mandy A, AU - Reyes,Maria, AU - Young,Paul, AU - Calame,Lynne, AU - Sheng,Xiaoming, AU - Weng,Hsin-yi Cindy, AU - Byington,Carrie L, PY - 2010/3/24/entrez PY - 2010/3/24/pubmed PY - 2010/11/5/medline SP - 751 EP - 5 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 29 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Identify parental beliefs and barriers related to influenza immunization of school-aged children and acceptance of school-based influenza immunization. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of parents of elementary school-aged children in November 2008. Outcomes were receipt of influenza vaccine, acceptance of school-based immunization, and barriers to immunization. RESULTS: Response rate was 65% (259/397). Parents reported that 26% of children had received the vaccine and 24% intended receipt. A total of 50% did not plan to immunize. Factors associated with receipt were belief that immunization is a social norm (adjusted odds ratios [AOR], 10.8; 95% CI, 2.8-41.8), belief in benefit (AOR, 7.8; CI, 1.8-33.8), discussion with a doctor (AOR, 7.0; CI, 2.9-16.8), and belief that vaccine is safe (AOR, 4.0; CI, 1.0-15.8). A total of 75% of parents would immunize their children at school if the vaccine were free, including 59% (76/129) who did not plan to immunize. Factors associated with acceptance of school-based immunization were belief in benefit (AOR, 6.1; 95% CI, 2.7-14.0), endorsement of medical setting barriers (AOR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.3-10.3), and beliefs that immunization is a social norm (AOR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.4-7.6) and that the child is susceptible to influenza (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7). Medical setting barriers were competing time demands, inconvenience, and cost; school barriers were parents' desire to be with children and competence of person delivering the vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: School-based immunization programs can increase immunization coverage by targeting parents for whom time demands and inconvenience are barriers, demonstrating that immunization is a social norm, and addressing concerns about influenza vaccine benefit and safety. SN - 1532-0987 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20308935/Parental_attitudes_about_influenza_immunization_and_school_based_immunization_for_school_aged_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e3181d8562c DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -