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Contributions of lean mass and fat mass to bone mineral density: a study in postmenopausal women.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010 Mar 26; 11:59.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The relative contribution of lean and fat to the determination of bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women is a contentious issue. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that lean mass is a better determinant of BMD than fat mass.

METHODS

This cross-sectional study involved 210 postmenopausal women of Vietnamese background, aged between 50 and 85 years, who were randomly sampled from various districts in Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Whole body scans, femoral neck, and lumbar spine BMD were measured by DXA (QDR 4500, Hologic Inc., Waltham, MA). Lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) were derived from the whole body scan. Furthermore, lean mass index (LMi) and fat mass index (FMi) were calculated as ratio of LM or FM to body height in metre squared (m2).

RESULTS

In multiple linear regression analysis, both LM and FM were independent and significant predictors of BMD at the spine and femoral neck. Age, lean mass and fat mass collectively explained 33% variance of lumbar spine and 38% variance of femoral neck BMD. Replacing LM and FM by LMi and LMi did not alter the result. In both analyses, the influence of LM or LMi was greater than FM and FMi. Simulation analysis suggested that a study with 1000 individuals has a 78% chance of finding the significant effects of both LM and FM, and a 22% chance of finding LM alone significant, and zero chance of finding the effect of fat mass alone.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that both lean mass and fat mass are important determinants of BMD. For a given body size -- measured either by lean mass or height --women with greater fat mass have greater BMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Pham Ngoc Thach University of Medicine, 86/2 Thanh Thai St, Ward 12, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. thuclanhopham@pnt.edu.vnNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20346165

Citation

Ho-Pham, Lan T., et al. "Contributions of Lean Mass and Fat Mass to Bone Mineral Density: a Study in Postmenopausal Women." BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, vol. 11, 2010, p. 59.
Ho-Pham LT, Nguyen ND, Lai TQ, et al. Contributions of lean mass and fat mass to bone mineral density: a study in postmenopausal women. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:59.
Ho-Pham, L. T., Nguyen, N. D., Lai, T. Q., & Nguyen, T. V. (2010). Contributions of lean mass and fat mass to bone mineral density: a study in postmenopausal women. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 11, 59. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-11-59
Ho-Pham LT, et al. Contributions of Lean Mass and Fat Mass to Bone Mineral Density: a Study in Postmenopausal Women. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010 Mar 26;11:59. PubMed PMID: 20346165.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contributions of lean mass and fat mass to bone mineral density: a study in postmenopausal women. AU - Ho-Pham,Lan T, AU - Nguyen,Nguyen D, AU - Lai,Thai Q, AU - Nguyen,Tuan V, Y1 - 2010/03/26/ PY - 2009/11/18/received PY - 2010/03/26/accepted PY - 2010/3/30/entrez PY - 2010/3/30/pubmed PY - 2010/7/20/medline SP - 59 EP - 59 JF - BMC musculoskeletal disorders JO - BMC Musculoskelet Disord VL - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The relative contribution of lean and fat to the determination of bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women is a contentious issue. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that lean mass is a better determinant of BMD than fat mass. METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved 210 postmenopausal women of Vietnamese background, aged between 50 and 85 years, who were randomly sampled from various districts in Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam). Whole body scans, femoral neck, and lumbar spine BMD were measured by DXA (QDR 4500, Hologic Inc., Waltham, MA). Lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) were derived from the whole body scan. Furthermore, lean mass index (LMi) and fat mass index (FMi) were calculated as ratio of LM or FM to body height in metre squared (m2). RESULTS: In multiple linear regression analysis, both LM and FM were independent and significant predictors of BMD at the spine and femoral neck. Age, lean mass and fat mass collectively explained 33% variance of lumbar spine and 38% variance of femoral neck BMD. Replacing LM and FM by LMi and LMi did not alter the result. In both analyses, the influence of LM or LMi was greater than FM and FMi. Simulation analysis suggested that a study with 1000 individuals has a 78% chance of finding the significant effects of both LM and FM, and a 22% chance of finding LM alone significant, and zero chance of finding the effect of fat mass alone. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both lean mass and fat mass are important determinants of BMD. For a given body size -- measured either by lean mass or height --women with greater fat mass have greater BMD. SN - 1471-2474 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20346165/Contributions_of_lean_mass_and_fat_mass_to_bone_mineral_density:_a_study_in_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://bmcmusculoskeletdisord.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2474-11-59 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -