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[A new case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome].
Arch Pediatr 2010; 17(5):502-6AP

Abstract

We report a case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) with milk whose signs of milk intolerance began in the 1st days of life, consisting in minor and nonspecific symptoms. The 3 foods in question were cow's milk, soja, and wheat. The diagnosis of FPIES was suspected at the age of 9 months, after 3 hospitalizations for vomiting, sometimes associated with lethargy and hypotension, which occurred around 2h after cow's milk ingestion. Symptoms were not associated with positive specific IgE and cutaneous tests. Signs then occurred with soja and wheat. Because of the late diagnosis, 3 anaphylactic shock episodes occurred. FPIES is an uncommon cell-mediated food allergy reaction. This syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, especially severe vomiting, sometimes associated with anaphylactic shock. Usually signs occur 2h after ingestion. These reactions begin early, in the 1st months of life, and regress by the age of 3 years in 38-100% of cases depending on the responsible food. They are usually induced by cow's milk and soy proteins. Diagnosis is difficult and delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Oral food challenge is the only examination that confirms the diagnosis. Treatment involves the exclusion of the specific food involved. Severe reactions require treatment of shock and adjunction of corticosteroids.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Département mère-enfant, service de néonatologie, centre hospitalier Sud-Essonne, 26, avenue Charles-de-Gaulle, BP 107, 91152 Etampes cedex 02, France. chaabane.mohamed@neuf.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

20346636

Citation

Chaabane, M, et al. "[A New Case of Food Protein-induced Enterocolitis Syndrome]." Archives De Pediatrie : Organe Officiel De La Societe Francaise De Pediatrie, vol. 17, no. 5, 2010, pp. 502-6.
Chaabane M, Bidat E, Chevallier B. [A new case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome]. Arch Pediatr. 2010;17(5):502-6.
Chaabane, M., Bidat, E., & Chevallier, B. (2010). [A new case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome]. Archives De Pediatrie : Organe Officiel De La Societe Francaise De Pediatrie, 17(5), pp. 502-6. doi:10.1016/j.arcped.2010.02.011.
Chaabane M, Bidat E, Chevallier B. [A New Case of Food Protein-induced Enterocolitis Syndrome]. Arch Pediatr. 2010;17(5):502-6. PubMed PMID: 20346636.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [A new case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome]. AU - Chaabane,M, AU - Bidat,E, AU - Chevallier,B, Y1 - 2010/03/25/ PY - 2008/12/14/received PY - 2009/06/08/revised PY - 2010/02/11/accepted PY - 2010/3/30/entrez PY - 2010/3/30/pubmed PY - 2010/8/4/medline SP - 502 EP - 6 JF - Archives de pediatrie : organe officiel de la Societe francaise de pediatrie JO - Arch Pediatr VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - We report a case of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) with milk whose signs of milk intolerance began in the 1st days of life, consisting in minor and nonspecific symptoms. The 3 foods in question were cow's milk, soja, and wheat. The diagnosis of FPIES was suspected at the age of 9 months, after 3 hospitalizations for vomiting, sometimes associated with lethargy and hypotension, which occurred around 2h after cow's milk ingestion. Symptoms were not associated with positive specific IgE and cutaneous tests. Signs then occurred with soja and wheat. Because of the late diagnosis, 3 anaphylactic shock episodes occurred. FPIES is an uncommon cell-mediated food allergy reaction. This syndrome is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, especially severe vomiting, sometimes associated with anaphylactic shock. Usually signs occur 2h after ingestion. These reactions begin early, in the 1st months of life, and regress by the age of 3 years in 38-100% of cases depending on the responsible food. They are usually induced by cow's milk and soy proteins. Diagnosis is difficult and delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Oral food challenge is the only examination that confirms the diagnosis. Treatment involves the exclusion of the specific food involved. Severe reactions require treatment of shock and adjunction of corticosteroids. SN - 1769-664X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20346636/[A_new_case_of_food_protein_induced_enterocolitis_syndrome]_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0929-693X(10)00081-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -