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Risk of pancreatic cancer by alcohol dose, duration, and pattern of consumption, including binge drinking: a population-based study.
Cancer Causes Control 2010; 21(7):1047-59CC

Abstract

Alcohol consumption is postulated to be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PCA), but clarification of degree of risk related to consumption characteristics is lacking. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and PCA in a population-based case-control study (532 cases, 1,701 controls) in the San Francisco Bay Area. Population-based controls were frequency-matched by sex, age within 5-year categories and county of residence to cases identified by the cancer registry's rapid case ascertainment. Detailed alcohol consumption data, including binge drinking (>or=5 drinks/day), were collected during in-person interviews. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were computed using adjusted unconditional logistic regression. Depending on dose, duration, and pattern of drinking, ORs were increased 1.5- to 6-fold among men but not women. In men, ORs increased with increasing overall alcohol consumption (22-35 drinks/week OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.1-4.0; >or=35 drinks/week OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3-5.1, p-trend = 0.04). Most notable were effects with a history of binge drinking (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.5) including increased number of drinks per day (p-trend = 0.002), and increased years of binge drinking (p-trend = 0.0006). In fully adjusted models that included smoking and other confounders, ORs for binge drinking in men were somewhat higher than in age-adjusted models. Results from our detailed analyses provide support for heavy alcohol consumption (including binge drinking) as a risk factor for PCA in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Harold C Simmons Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-8887, USA. samir.gupta@utsouthwestern.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20349126

Citation

Gupta, Samir, et al. "Risk of Pancreatic Cancer By Alcohol Dose, Duration, and Pattern of Consumption, Including Binge Drinking: a Population-based Study." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 21, no. 7, 2010, pp. 1047-59.
Gupta S, Wang F, Holly EA, et al. Risk of pancreatic cancer by alcohol dose, duration, and pattern of consumption, including binge drinking: a population-based study. Cancer Causes Control. 2010;21(7):1047-59.
Gupta, S., Wang, F., Holly, E. A., & Bracci, P. M. (2010). Risk of pancreatic cancer by alcohol dose, duration, and pattern of consumption, including binge drinking: a population-based study. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 21(7), pp. 1047-59. doi:10.1007/s10552-010-9533-6.
Gupta S, et al. Risk of Pancreatic Cancer By Alcohol Dose, Duration, and Pattern of Consumption, Including Binge Drinking: a Population-based Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2010;21(7):1047-59. PubMed PMID: 20349126.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of pancreatic cancer by alcohol dose, duration, and pattern of consumption, including binge drinking: a population-based study. AU - Gupta,Samir, AU - Wang,Furong, AU - Holly,Elizabeth A, AU - Bracci,Paige M, Y1 - 2010/03/27/ PY - 2009/11/16/received PY - 2010/03/04/accepted PY - 2010/3/30/entrez PY - 2010/3/30/pubmed PY - 2010/9/16/medline SP - 1047 EP - 59 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 21 IS - 7 N2 - Alcohol consumption is postulated to be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PCA), but clarification of degree of risk related to consumption characteristics is lacking. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and PCA in a population-based case-control study (532 cases, 1,701 controls) in the San Francisco Bay Area. Population-based controls were frequency-matched by sex, age within 5-year categories and county of residence to cases identified by the cancer registry's rapid case ascertainment. Detailed alcohol consumption data, including binge drinking (>or=5 drinks/day), were collected during in-person interviews. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were computed using adjusted unconditional logistic regression. Depending on dose, duration, and pattern of drinking, ORs were increased 1.5- to 6-fold among men but not women. In men, ORs increased with increasing overall alcohol consumption (22-35 drinks/week OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.1-4.0; >or=35 drinks/week OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3-5.1, p-trend = 0.04). Most notable were effects with a history of binge drinking (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.6-7.5) including increased number of drinks per day (p-trend = 0.002), and increased years of binge drinking (p-trend = 0.0006). In fully adjusted models that included smoking and other confounders, ORs for binge drinking in men were somewhat higher than in age-adjusted models. Results from our detailed analyses provide support for heavy alcohol consumption (including binge drinking) as a risk factor for PCA in men. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20349126/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9533-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -