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Unfair? It depends: neural correlates of fairness in social context.
Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2010 Dec; 5(4):414-23.SC

Abstract

Fairness is a key concept in social interactions and is influenced by intentionality considerations. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the neural correlates of fairness by focusing on responder behavior to unfair offers in an Ultimatum Game paradigm with conditions that differed in their intentionality constraints. Brain activity underlying rejection vs acceptance of unfair offers appeared highly dependent on intentionality. Rejection of unfair offers when the proposer had no-alternative as well as acceptance of offers when the proposer had a fair- or hyperfair-alternative was associated with activation in a network of regions including the insula and the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. These activations were interpreted as neural responses to norm violations because they were mostly involved when behavior was inconsistent with socially accepted behavior patterns. Rejection of unfair offers in the no-alternative condition further resulted in activity in the anterior medial prefrontal cortex and the temporoparietal junction, which was interpreted in terms of higher moral mentalizing demands required in social decision-making when rejection could not be readily justified. Together, results highlight the significance of intentionality considerations in fairness-related social decision-making processes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Psychology, Department of Developmental Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK Leiden, The Netherlands. bguroglu@fsw.leidenuniv.n.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20350933

Citation

Güroğlu, Berna, et al. "Unfair? It Depends: Neural Correlates of Fairness in Social Context." Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, vol. 5, no. 4, 2010, pp. 414-23.
Güroğlu B, van den Bos W, Rombouts SA, et al. Unfair? It depends: neural correlates of fairness in social context. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2010;5(4):414-23.
Güroğlu, B., van den Bos, W., Rombouts, S. A., & Crone, E. A. (2010). Unfair? It depends: neural correlates of fairness in social context. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 5(4), 414-23. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsq013
Güroğlu B, et al. Unfair? It Depends: Neural Correlates of Fairness in Social Context. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci. 2010;5(4):414-23. PubMed PMID: 20350933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unfair? It depends: neural correlates of fairness in social context. AU - Güroğlu,Berna, AU - van den Bos,Wouter, AU - Rombouts,Serge A R B, AU - Crone,Eveline A, Y1 - 2010/03/28/ PY - 2010/3/31/entrez PY - 2010/3/31/pubmed PY - 2011/3/26/medline SP - 414 EP - 23 JF - Social cognitive and affective neuroscience JO - Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci VL - 5 IS - 4 N2 - Fairness is a key concept in social interactions and is influenced by intentionality considerations. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the neural correlates of fairness by focusing on responder behavior to unfair offers in an Ultimatum Game paradigm with conditions that differed in their intentionality constraints. Brain activity underlying rejection vs acceptance of unfair offers appeared highly dependent on intentionality. Rejection of unfair offers when the proposer had no-alternative as well as acceptance of offers when the proposer had a fair- or hyperfair-alternative was associated with activation in a network of regions including the insula and the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. These activations were interpreted as neural responses to norm violations because they were mostly involved when behavior was inconsistent with socially accepted behavior patterns. Rejection of unfair offers in the no-alternative condition further resulted in activity in the anterior medial prefrontal cortex and the temporoparietal junction, which was interpreted in terms of higher moral mentalizing demands required in social decision-making when rejection could not be readily justified. Together, results highlight the significance of intentionality considerations in fairness-related social decision-making processes. SN - 1749-5024 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20350933/Unfair_It_depends:_neural_correlates_of_fairness_in_social_context_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/scan/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/scan/nsq013 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -