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Fibromyalgia and nutrition, what do we know?
Rheumatol Int 2010; 30(11):1417-27RI

Abstract

Many people suffer from fibromyalgia (FM) without an effective treatment. They do not have a good quality of life and cannot maintain normal daily activity. Among the different hypotheses for its ethiopathophysiology, oxidative stress is one of the possibilities. Non-scientific information addressed to patients regarding the benefits of nutrition is widely available, and they are used to trying non-evidenced strategies. The aim of this paper is to find out what we know right now from scientific studies regarding fibromyalgia disease and nutritional status, diets and food supplements. A systematic search has been performed on Medline with a wide range of terms about these nutritional issues. The search has been made during 2009, for articles published between 1998 and 2008.

TARGET POPULATION

people suffering from FM. Vegetarian diets could have some beneficial effects probably due to the increase in antioxidant intake. There is a high prevalence of obesity and overweight in patients, and weight control seems to be an effective tool to improve the symptoms. Some nutritional deficiencies have been described, it is not clear whether they are directly related to this disease or not. About the usefulness of some food supplements we found very little data, and it seems that more studies are needed to prove which ones could be of help. Dietary advice is necessary to these patients to improve their diets and maintain normal weight. It would be interesting to investigate more in the field of nutrition and FM to reveal any possible relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, Joan XXIII, s/n., 08028, Barcelona, Spain. encavifibro@yahoo.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20358204

Citation

Arranz, Laura-Isabel, et al. "Fibromyalgia and Nutrition, what Do We Know?" Rheumatology International, vol. 30, no. 11, 2010, pp. 1417-27.
Arranz LI, Canela MA, Rafecas M. Fibromyalgia and nutrition, what do we know? Rheumatol Int. 2010;30(11):1417-27.
Arranz, L. I., Canela, M. A., & Rafecas, M. (2010). Fibromyalgia and nutrition, what do we know? Rheumatology International, 30(11), pp. 1417-27. doi:10.1007/s00296-010-1443-0.
Arranz LI, Canela MA, Rafecas M. Fibromyalgia and Nutrition, what Do We Know. Rheumatol Int. 2010;30(11):1417-27. PubMed PMID: 20358204.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fibromyalgia and nutrition, what do we know? AU - Arranz,Laura-Isabel, AU - Canela,Miguel-Angel, AU - Rafecas,Magda, Y1 - 2010/04/01/ PY - 2009/12/03/received PY - 2010/03/12/accepted PY - 2010/4/2/entrez PY - 2010/4/2/pubmed PY - 2011/5/18/medline SP - 1417 EP - 27 JF - Rheumatology international JO - Rheumatol. Int. VL - 30 IS - 11 N2 - UNLABELLED: Many people suffer from fibromyalgia (FM) without an effective treatment. They do not have a good quality of life and cannot maintain normal daily activity. Among the different hypotheses for its ethiopathophysiology, oxidative stress is one of the possibilities. Non-scientific information addressed to patients regarding the benefits of nutrition is widely available, and they are used to trying non-evidenced strategies. The aim of this paper is to find out what we know right now from scientific studies regarding fibromyalgia disease and nutritional status, diets and food supplements. A systematic search has been performed on Medline with a wide range of terms about these nutritional issues. The search has been made during 2009, for articles published between 1998 and 2008. TARGET POPULATION: people suffering from FM. Vegetarian diets could have some beneficial effects probably due to the increase in antioxidant intake. There is a high prevalence of obesity and overweight in patients, and weight control seems to be an effective tool to improve the symptoms. Some nutritional deficiencies have been described, it is not clear whether they are directly related to this disease or not. About the usefulness of some food supplements we found very little data, and it seems that more studies are needed to prove which ones could be of help. Dietary advice is necessary to these patients to improve their diets and maintain normal weight. It would be interesting to investigate more in the field of nutrition and FM to reveal any possible relationships. SN - 1437-160X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20358204/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-010-1443-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -