Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Common dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer: analysis from the United Kingdom Women's Cohort Study.
Nutr Cancer 2010; 62(3):300-6NC

Abstract

The relationship between diet and breast cancer is uncertain. We assessed the relationship of 4 common dietary patterns to the risk of breast cancer using the UK Women's Cohort Study (UKWCS). A total of 35,372 women aged between 35 to 69 yr were recruited from 1995 to 1998. The UKWCS was selected to have a wide range of dietary intakes; 28% were self-reported vegetarian. Diet was assessed at baseline by a 217-item food frequency questionnaire. Four dietary patterns were defined based on a hierarchy of consumption of fish and meat to reflect commonly consumed dietary patterns. Hazards ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for known confounders. Subjects were followed up for a mean of 9 yr, and 330 premenopausal and 453 postmenopausal women developed invasive breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, there was a strong inverse association between the fish eating dietary pattern 0.60 (95% CI = 0.38-0.96) but not for a vegetarian pattern 0.85 (95% CI = 0.58-1.25) compared to red meat eaters. There were no statistically significant associations with dietary pattern and risk of premenopausal breast cancer. A fish eating dietary pattern that excludes meat from the diet may confer some benefit with regard to risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom. j.e.cade@leeds.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20358467

Citation

Cade, Janet E., et al. "Common Dietary Patterns and Risk of Breast Cancer: Analysis From the United Kingdom Women's Cohort Study." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 62, no. 3, 2010, pp. 300-6.
Cade JE, Taylor EF, Burley VJ, et al. Common dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer: analysis from the United Kingdom Women's Cohort Study. Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(3):300-6.
Cade, J. E., Taylor, E. F., Burley, V. J., & Greenwood, D. C. (2010). Common dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer: analysis from the United Kingdom Women's Cohort Study. Nutrition and Cancer, 62(3), pp. 300-6. doi:10.1080/01635580903441246.
Cade JE, et al. Common Dietary Patterns and Risk of Breast Cancer: Analysis From the United Kingdom Women's Cohort Study. Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(3):300-6. PubMed PMID: 20358467.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Common dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer: analysis from the United Kingdom Women's Cohort Study. AU - Cade,Janet E, AU - Taylor,E Faye, AU - Burley,Victoria J, AU - Greenwood,Darren C, PY - 2010/4/2/entrez PY - 2010/4/2/pubmed PY - 2010/6/25/medline SP - 300 EP - 6 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 62 IS - 3 N2 - The relationship between diet and breast cancer is uncertain. We assessed the relationship of 4 common dietary patterns to the risk of breast cancer using the UK Women's Cohort Study (UKWCS). A total of 35,372 women aged between 35 to 69 yr were recruited from 1995 to 1998. The UKWCS was selected to have a wide range of dietary intakes; 28% were self-reported vegetarian. Diet was assessed at baseline by a 217-item food frequency questionnaire. Four dietary patterns were defined based on a hierarchy of consumption of fish and meat to reflect commonly consumed dietary patterns. Hazards ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for known confounders. Subjects were followed up for a mean of 9 yr, and 330 premenopausal and 453 postmenopausal women developed invasive breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, there was a strong inverse association between the fish eating dietary pattern 0.60 (95% CI = 0.38-0.96) but not for a vegetarian pattern 0.85 (95% CI = 0.58-1.25) compared to red meat eaters. There were no statistically significant associations with dietary pattern and risk of premenopausal breast cancer. A fish eating dietary pattern that excludes meat from the diet may confer some benefit with regard to risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20358467/Common_dietary_patterns_and_risk_of_breast_cancer:_analysis_from_the_United_Kingdom_Women's_Cohort_Study_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635580903441246 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -