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Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcomes in both blunt and penetrating trauma.
Am J Surg. 2010 Apr; 199(4):554-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with penetrating injuries are known to have worse outcomes than those with blunt trauma. We hypothesize that within each injury mechanism there should be no outcome difference between insured and uninsured patients.

METHODS

The National Trauma Data Bank version 7 was analyzed. Patients aged 65 years and older and burn patients were excluded. The insurance status was categorized as insured (private, government/military, or Medicaid) and uninsured. Multivariate analysis adjusted for insurance status, mechanism of injury, age, race, sex, injury severity score, shock, head injury, extremity injury, teaching hospital status, and year.

RESULTS

A total of 1,203,243 patients were analyzed, with a mortality rate of 3.7%. The death rate was significantly higher in penetrating trauma patients versus blunt trauma patients (7.9% vs 3.0%; P < .001), and higher in the uninsured (5.3% vs 3.2%; P < .001). On multivariate analysis, uninsured patients had an increased odds of death than insured patients, in both penetrating and blunt trauma patients. Penetrating trauma patients with insurance still had a greater risk of death than blunt trauma patients without insurance.

CONCLUSIONS

Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcome in both penetrating and blunt trauma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. wgreene@howard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20359573

Citation

Greene, Wendy R., et al. "Insurance Status Is a Potent Predictor of Outcomes in Both Blunt and Penetrating Trauma." American Journal of Surgery, vol. 199, no. 4, 2010, pp. 554-7.
Greene WR, Oyetunji TA, Bowers U, et al. Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcomes in both blunt and penetrating trauma. Am J Surg. 2010;199(4):554-7.
Greene, W. R., Oyetunji, T. A., Bowers, U., Haider, A. H., Mellman, T. A., Cornwell, E. E., Siram, S. M., & Chang, D. C. (2010). Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcomes in both blunt and penetrating trauma. American Journal of Surgery, 199(4), 554-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2009.11.005
Greene WR, et al. Insurance Status Is a Potent Predictor of Outcomes in Both Blunt and Penetrating Trauma. Am J Surg. 2010;199(4):554-7. PubMed PMID: 20359573.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcomes in both blunt and penetrating trauma. AU - Greene,Wendy R, AU - Oyetunji,Tolulope A, AU - Bowers,Umar, AU - Haider,Adil H, AU - Mellman,Thomas A, AU - Cornwell,Edward E, AU - Siram,Suryanarayana M, AU - Chang,David C, PY - 2009/06/29/received PY - 2009/09/28/revised PY - 2009/11/20/accepted PY - 2010/4/3/entrez PY - 2010/4/3/pubmed PY - 2010/4/20/medline SP - 554 EP - 7 JF - American journal of surgery JO - Am J Surg VL - 199 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients with penetrating injuries are known to have worse outcomes than those with blunt trauma. We hypothesize that within each injury mechanism there should be no outcome difference between insured and uninsured patients. METHODS: The National Trauma Data Bank version 7 was analyzed. Patients aged 65 years and older and burn patients were excluded. The insurance status was categorized as insured (private, government/military, or Medicaid) and uninsured. Multivariate analysis adjusted for insurance status, mechanism of injury, age, race, sex, injury severity score, shock, head injury, extremity injury, teaching hospital status, and year. RESULTS: A total of 1,203,243 patients were analyzed, with a mortality rate of 3.7%. The death rate was significantly higher in penetrating trauma patients versus blunt trauma patients (7.9% vs 3.0%; P < .001), and higher in the uninsured (5.3% vs 3.2%; P < .001). On multivariate analysis, uninsured patients had an increased odds of death than insured patients, in both penetrating and blunt trauma patients. Penetrating trauma patients with insurance still had a greater risk of death than blunt trauma patients without insurance. CONCLUSIONS: Insurance status is a potent predictor of outcome in both penetrating and blunt trauma. SN - 1879-1883 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20359573/Insurance_status_is_a_potent_predictor_of_outcomes_in_both_blunt_and_penetrating_trauma_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9610(10)00011-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -