Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Increased tissue factor pathway inhibitor and homocysteine in Alzheimer's disease.
Neurobiol Aging. 2012 Feb; 33(2):226-33.NA

Abstract

We investigated the possible involvement of vascular damage in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by assessment of plasma levels of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a serine protease inhibitor induced by endothelial injury, and homocysteine (Hcy), a known risk factor for cerebrovascular disorders, folate levels were also measured. 110 probable AD, 38 mild cognitive impairment, 31 patients affected by idiopathic Parkinson's disease (without dementia) and 100 healthy controls, who displayed no vascular disorders were enrolled. TFPI and Hcy were significantly higher in AD patients with respect to other groups. The levels of TFPI and Hcy were positively correlated in hyperhomocysteinemic AD and mild cognitive impairment subjects, and were negatively correlated with folate levels. Our findings suggest that an impairment of endothelial function associated with high Hcy levels may occur in AD patients, despite the absence of manifest cerebrovascular lesions. Therefore, TFPI may represent a candidate marker of endothelial damage in AD and might be used for the identification and monitoring of patients that would benefit from folate supplementation treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Technologies, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza (MI), Italy. fabrizio.piazza@unimib.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20359777

Citation

Piazza, Fabrizio, et al. "Increased Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor and Homocysteine in Alzheimer's Disease." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 33, no. 2, 2012, pp. 226-33.
Piazza F, Galimberti G, Conti E, et al. Increased tissue factor pathway inhibitor and homocysteine in Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiol Aging. 2012;33(2):226-33.
Piazza, F., Galimberti, G., Conti, E., Isella, V., Perlangeli, M. V., Speranza, T., Borroni, B., Pogliani, E. M., Padovani, A., & Ferrarese, C. (2012). Increased tissue factor pathway inhibitor and homocysteine in Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiology of Aging, 33(2), 226-33. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2010.02.016
Piazza F, et al. Increased Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor and Homocysteine in Alzheimer's Disease. Neurobiol Aging. 2012;33(2):226-33. PubMed PMID: 20359777.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased tissue factor pathway inhibitor and homocysteine in Alzheimer's disease. AU - Piazza,Fabrizio, AU - Galimberti,Gloria, AU - Conti,Elisa, AU - Isella,Valeria, AU - Perlangeli,Maria V, AU - Speranza,Tiziana, AU - Borroni,Barbara, AU - Pogliani,Enrico M, AU - Padovani,Alessandro, AU - Ferrarese,Carlo, Y1 - 2010/03/31/ PY - 2009/06/10/received PY - 2009/11/17/revised PY - 2010/02/19/accepted PY - 2010/4/3/entrez PY - 2010/4/3/pubmed PY - 2012/4/20/medline SP - 226 EP - 33 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol Aging VL - 33 IS - 2 N2 - We investigated the possible involvement of vascular damage in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by assessment of plasma levels of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a serine protease inhibitor induced by endothelial injury, and homocysteine (Hcy), a known risk factor for cerebrovascular disorders, folate levels were also measured. 110 probable AD, 38 mild cognitive impairment, 31 patients affected by idiopathic Parkinson's disease (without dementia) and 100 healthy controls, who displayed no vascular disorders were enrolled. TFPI and Hcy were significantly higher in AD patients with respect to other groups. The levels of TFPI and Hcy were positively correlated in hyperhomocysteinemic AD and mild cognitive impairment subjects, and were negatively correlated with folate levels. Our findings suggest that an impairment of endothelial function associated with high Hcy levels may occur in AD patients, despite the absence of manifest cerebrovascular lesions. Therefore, TFPI may represent a candidate marker of endothelial damage in AD and might be used for the identification and monitoring of patients that would benefit from folate supplementation treatment. SN - 1558-1497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20359777/Increased_tissue_factor_pathway_inhibitor_and_homocysteine_in_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(10)00107-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -