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Low calorie dieting increases cortisol.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test the hypothesis that dieting, or the restriction of caloric intake, is ineffective because it increases chronic psychological stress and cortisol production--two factors that are known to cause weight gain; and to examine the respective roles of the two main behaviors that comprise dieting--monitoring one's caloric intake and restricting one's caloric intake--on psychological and biological stress indicators.

METHODS

In a 2 (monitoring vs. not) x 2 (restricting vs. not) fully crossed, controlled experiment, 121 female participants were assigned randomly to one of four dietary interventions for 3 weeks. The monitoring + restricting condition tracked their caloric intake and restricted their caloric intake (1200 kcal/day); the monitoring only condition tracked their caloric intake but ate normally; the restricting only condition was provided 1200 kcal/day of food but did not track their calories, and the control group ate normally and did not track their intake. Before and after the interventions, participants completed measures of perceived stress and 2 days of diurnal saliva sampling to test for cortisol.

RESULTS

Restricting calories increased the total output of cortisol, and monitoring calories increased perceived stress.

CONCLUSIONS

Dieting may be deleterious to psychological well-being and biological functioning, and changes in clinical recommendations may be in order.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars Program, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94118, USA. tomiyamaj@chc.ucsf.edu

    , , , ,

    Source

    Psychosomatic medicine 72:4 2010 May pg 357-64

    MeSH

    Body Mass Index
    Caloric Restriction
    Circadian Rhythm
    Diet, Reducing
    Eating
    Energy Intake
    Energy Metabolism
    Hydrocortisone
    Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
    Nutritional Requirements
    Pituitary-Adrenal System
    Saliva
    Stress, Psychological
    Wakefulness
    Weight Gain

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20368473

    Citation

    Tomiyama, A Janet, et al. "Low Calorie Dieting Increases Cortisol." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 72, no. 4, 2010, pp. 357-64.
    Tomiyama AJ, Mann T, Vinas D, et al. Low calorie dieting increases cortisol. Psychosom Med. 2010;72(4):357-64.
    Tomiyama, A. J., Mann, T., Vinas, D., Hunger, J. M., Dejager, J., & Taylor, S. E. (2010). Low calorie dieting increases cortisol. Psychosomatic Medicine, 72(4), pp. 357-64. doi:10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181d9523c.
    Tomiyama AJ, et al. Low Calorie Dieting Increases Cortisol. Psychosom Med. 2010;72(4):357-64. PubMed PMID: 20368473.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Low calorie dieting increases cortisol. AU - Tomiyama,A Janet, AU - Mann,Traci, AU - Vinas,Danielle, AU - Hunger,Jeffrey M, AU - Dejager,Jill, AU - Taylor,Shelley E, Y1 - 2010/04/05/ PY - 2010/4/7/entrez PY - 2010/4/7/pubmed PY - 2010/7/16/medline SP - 357 EP - 64 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 72 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that dieting, or the restriction of caloric intake, is ineffective because it increases chronic psychological stress and cortisol production--two factors that are known to cause weight gain; and to examine the respective roles of the two main behaviors that comprise dieting--monitoring one's caloric intake and restricting one's caloric intake--on psychological and biological stress indicators. METHODS: In a 2 (monitoring vs. not) x 2 (restricting vs. not) fully crossed, controlled experiment, 121 female participants were assigned randomly to one of four dietary interventions for 3 weeks. The monitoring + restricting condition tracked their caloric intake and restricted their caloric intake (1200 kcal/day); the monitoring only condition tracked their caloric intake but ate normally; the restricting only condition was provided 1200 kcal/day of food but did not track their calories, and the control group ate normally and did not track their intake. Before and after the interventions, participants completed measures of perceived stress and 2 days of diurnal saliva sampling to test for cortisol. RESULTS: Restricting calories increased the total output of cortisol, and monitoring calories increased perceived stress. CONCLUSIONS: Dieting may be deleterious to psychological well-being and biological functioning, and changes in clinical recommendations may be in order. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20368473/full_citation L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=20368473 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -