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In the face of anger: startle modulation to graded facial expressions.
Psychophysiology. 2010 Sep; 47(5):874-8.P

Abstract

In the present study, the startle reflex was examined with respect to the degree of anger displayed in facial expressions. To this end, 52 participants viewed faces that were morphed to display 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100% anger. As the percentage of anger in faces increased from 0 to 100%, faces were perceived as increasingly angry; however, relative to neutral facial expressions, startle amplitude was only potentiated to maximally angry faces. These data imply a non-linear relationship between the intensity of angry faces and defensive physiological activity. This pattern of startle modulation suggests a categorical distinction between threatening (100% anger) and other facial expressions presented. These results are further discussed in terms of existing data, and how this paradigm might be utilized in psychopathology research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2500, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20374543

Citation

Dunning, Jonathan P., et al. "In the Face of Anger: Startle Modulation to Graded Facial Expressions." Psychophysiology, vol. 47, no. 5, 2010, pp. 874-8.
Dunning JP, Auriemmo A, Castille C, et al. In the face of anger: startle modulation to graded facial expressions. Psychophysiology. 2010;47(5):874-8.
Dunning, J. P., Auriemmo, A., Castille, C., & Hajcak, G. (2010). In the face of anger: startle modulation to graded facial expressions. Psychophysiology, 47(5), 874-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8986.2010.01007.x
Dunning JP, et al. In the Face of Anger: Startle Modulation to Graded Facial Expressions. Psychophysiology. 2010;47(5):874-8. PubMed PMID: 20374543.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In the face of anger: startle modulation to graded facial expressions. AU - Dunning,Jonathan P, AU - Auriemmo,Anthony, AU - Castille,Claude, AU - Hajcak,Greg, Y1 - 2010/03/29/ PY - 2010/4/9/entrez PY - 2010/4/9/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 874 EP - 8 JF - Psychophysiology JO - Psychophysiology VL - 47 IS - 5 N2 - In the present study, the startle reflex was examined with respect to the degree of anger displayed in facial expressions. To this end, 52 participants viewed faces that were morphed to display 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100% anger. As the percentage of anger in faces increased from 0 to 100%, faces were perceived as increasingly angry; however, relative to neutral facial expressions, startle amplitude was only potentiated to maximally angry faces. These data imply a non-linear relationship between the intensity of angry faces and defensive physiological activity. This pattern of startle modulation suggests a categorical distinction between threatening (100% anger) and other facial expressions presented. These results are further discussed in terms of existing data, and how this paradigm might be utilized in psychopathology research. SN - 1540-5958 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20374543/In_the_face_of_anger:_startle_modulation_to_graded_facial_expressions_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8986.2010.01007.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -