Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

How respiratory muscle strength correlates with cough capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness.
Yonsei Med J 2010; 51(3):392-7YM

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study is to investigate how respiratory muscle strength correlates to cough capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Forty-five patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), 43 with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), and 42 with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) were recruited. Pulmonary function tests including forced vital capacity (FVC) and respiratory muscle strength (maximal expiratory pressure, MEP; maximal inspiratory pressure, MIP) were performed. The correlation between respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity was analyzed.

RESULTS

In the SCI group, FVC in a supine position (2,597 +/- 648 mL) was significantly higher than FVC in a sitting position (2,304 +/- 564 mL, p < 0.01). Conversely, in the ALS group, FVC sitting (1,370 +/- 604 mL) was significantly higher than in supine (1,168 +/- 599 mL, p < 0.01). In the DMD group, there was no statistically significant difference between FVC while sitting (1,342 +/- 506 mL) and FVC while supine (1,304 +/- 500 mL). In addition, the MEP and MIP of all three groups showed a significant correlation with peak cough flow (PCF) (p < 0.01, Pearson's correlation analysis). In the SCI group, MIP was more closely correlated with PCF, while in the ALS and DMD groups, MEP was more closely correlated with PCF (p < 0.01, multiple regression analysis).

CONCLUSION

To generate cough flow, inspiratory muscle strength is significantly more important for SCI patients, while expiratory muscle function is significantly more important for ALS and DMD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20376892

Citation

Park, Jung Hyun, et al. "How Respiratory Muscle Strength Correlates With Cough Capacity in Patients With Respiratory Muscle Weakness." Yonsei Medical Journal, vol. 51, no. 3, 2010, pp. 392-7.
Park JH, Kang SW, Lee SC, et al. How respiratory muscle strength correlates with cough capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness. Yonsei Med J. 2010;51(3):392-7.
Park, J. H., Kang, S. W., Lee, S. C., Choi, W. A., & Kim, D. H. (2010). How respiratory muscle strength correlates with cough capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness. Yonsei Medical Journal, 51(3), pp. 392-7. doi:10.3349/ymj.2010.51.3.392.
Park JH, et al. How Respiratory Muscle Strength Correlates With Cough Capacity in Patients With Respiratory Muscle Weakness. Yonsei Med J. 2010;51(3):392-7. PubMed PMID: 20376892.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How respiratory muscle strength correlates with cough capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness. AU - Park,Jung Hyun, AU - Kang,Seong-Woong, AU - Lee,Sang Chul, AU - Choi,Won Ah, AU - Kim,Dong Hyun, PY - 2010/4/9/entrez PY - 2010/4/9/pubmed PY - 2010/7/16/medline SP - 392 EP - 7 JF - Yonsei medical journal JO - Yonsei Med. J. VL - 51 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate how respiratory muscle strength correlates to cough capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-five patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), 43 with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), and 42 with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) were recruited. Pulmonary function tests including forced vital capacity (FVC) and respiratory muscle strength (maximal expiratory pressure, MEP; maximal inspiratory pressure, MIP) were performed. The correlation between respiratory muscle strength and cough capacity was analyzed. RESULTS: In the SCI group, FVC in a supine position (2,597 +/- 648 mL) was significantly higher than FVC in a sitting position (2,304 +/- 564 mL, p < 0.01). Conversely, in the ALS group, FVC sitting (1,370 +/- 604 mL) was significantly higher than in supine (1,168 +/- 599 mL, p < 0.01). In the DMD group, there was no statistically significant difference between FVC while sitting (1,342 +/- 506 mL) and FVC while supine (1,304 +/- 500 mL). In addition, the MEP and MIP of all three groups showed a significant correlation with peak cough flow (PCF) (p < 0.01, Pearson's correlation analysis). In the SCI group, MIP was more closely correlated with PCF, while in the ALS and DMD groups, MEP was more closely correlated with PCF (p < 0.01, multiple regression analysis). CONCLUSION: To generate cough flow, inspiratory muscle strength is significantly more important for SCI patients, while expiratory muscle function is significantly more important for ALS and DMD patients. SN - 1976-2437 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20376892/How_respiratory_muscle_strength_correlates_with_cough_capacity_in_patients_with_respiratory_muscle_weakness_ L2 - https://www.eymj.org/DOIx.php?id=10.3349/ymj.2010.51.3.392 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -