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Can you please put it out? Predicting non-smokers' assertiveness intentions at work.
Tob Control. 2010 Apr; 19(2):148-52.TC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The present study aimed to identify the psychosocial predictors of non-smoker employee intentions to ask smokers not to smoke at work. The predictive effects of past behaviour, anticipated regret, social norms, attitudinal, outcome expectancy and behavioural control beliefs were investigated in relation to the Attitudes-Social influence-self-Efficacy (ASE) model.

METHODS

Data were collected from Greek non-smoker employees (n=137, mean age=33.5, SD=10.5, 54.7% female) in 15 companies. The main outcome measure was assertiveness intention. Data on participants' past smoking, age, gender and on current smoking policy in the company were also collected.

RESULTS

The majority of employees (77.4%) reported being annoyed by exposure to passive smoking at work, but only 37% reported having asked a smoker colleague not to smoke in the last 30 days. Regression analysis showed that the strongest predictor of non-smokers' assertiveness intentions was how often they believed that other non-smokers were assertive. Perceived control over being assertive, annoyance with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at work and past assertive behaviour also significantly predicted assertiveness intentions.

CONCLUSIONS

Assertiveness by non-smoker employees seems to be guided mainly by normative and behavioural control beliefs, annoyance with SHS exposure at work, and past behaviour. Interventions to promote assertiveness in non-smokers might benefit from efficacy training combined with conveying the messages that the majority of other non-smokers are frequently annoyed by exposure to SHS, and that nearly half of all non-smokers are assertive towards smokers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

City College, International Faculty of the University of Sheffield, Thessaloniki, Greece.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20378590

Citation

Aspropoulos, Eleftherios, et al. "Can You Please Put It Out? Predicting Non-smokers' Assertiveness Intentions at Work." Tobacco Control, vol. 19, no. 2, 2010, pp. 148-52.
Aspropoulos E, Lazuras L, Rodafinos A, et al. Can you please put it out? Predicting non-smokers' assertiveness intentions at work. Tob Control. 2010;19(2):148-52.
Aspropoulos, E., Lazuras, L., Rodafinos, A., & Eiser, J. R. (2010). Can you please put it out? Predicting non-smokers' assertiveness intentions at work. Tobacco Control, 19(2), 148-52. https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.2009.031161
Aspropoulos E, et al. Can You Please Put It Out? Predicting Non-smokers' Assertiveness Intentions at Work. Tob Control. 2010;19(2):148-52. PubMed PMID: 20378590.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Can you please put it out? Predicting non-smokers' assertiveness intentions at work. AU - Aspropoulos,Eleftherios, AU - Lazuras,Lambros, AU - Rodafinos,Angelos, AU - Eiser,J Richard, PY - 2010/4/10/entrez PY - 2010/4/10/pubmed PY - 2010/7/2/medline SP - 148 EP - 52 JF - Tobacco control JO - Tob Control VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to identify the psychosocial predictors of non-smoker employee intentions to ask smokers not to smoke at work. The predictive effects of past behaviour, anticipated regret, social norms, attitudinal, outcome expectancy and behavioural control beliefs were investigated in relation to the Attitudes-Social influence-self-Efficacy (ASE) model. METHODS: Data were collected from Greek non-smoker employees (n=137, mean age=33.5, SD=10.5, 54.7% female) in 15 companies. The main outcome measure was assertiveness intention. Data on participants' past smoking, age, gender and on current smoking policy in the company were also collected. RESULTS: The majority of employees (77.4%) reported being annoyed by exposure to passive smoking at work, but only 37% reported having asked a smoker colleague not to smoke in the last 30 days. Regression analysis showed that the strongest predictor of non-smokers' assertiveness intentions was how often they believed that other non-smokers were assertive. Perceived control over being assertive, annoyance with secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure at work and past assertive behaviour also significantly predicted assertiveness intentions. CONCLUSIONS: Assertiveness by non-smoker employees seems to be guided mainly by normative and behavioural control beliefs, annoyance with SHS exposure at work, and past behaviour. Interventions to promote assertiveness in non-smokers might benefit from efficacy training combined with conveying the messages that the majority of other non-smokers are frequently annoyed by exposure to SHS, and that nearly half of all non-smokers are assertive towards smokers. SN - 1468-3318 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20378590/Can_you_please_put_it_out_Predicting_non_smokers'_assertiveness_intentions_at_work_ L2 - http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20378590 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -