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[An outbreak of human rabies transmitted by a cat in the town of Santander de Quilichao, Colombia, 2008].
Rev Salud Publica (Bogota). 2009 Dec; 11(6):931-43.RS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

A sylvatic rabies outbreak during March 2008 caused two human deaths in the town of Santander de Quilichao in Cauca, Colombia. This article describes the diagnostic laboratory techniques used, the field investigation and focus control used, as well as this outbreak's epidemiological significance and implications for public health.

METHODS

Rabies was diagnosed by direct immunofluorescence, biological tests involving inoculating mice, histopathology and immunohistochemistry and then typed by using monoclonal antibodies. Field investigation focused on searching for human and animal contacts, identifying suspicious cases and conducting an institutional search for rabid accidents. Focus control consisted of post-exposure treatment of the exposed population, vaccinating dogs and cats, collecting and eliminating stray animals and educating the community.

RESULTS

Two human rabies cases were confirmed in the laboratory and another was inferred in a cat by epidemiological nexus. Antigenic variant 3 was isolated from the human cases. 11,369 dogs, 3,325 cats and 217 humans were vaccinated.

CONCLUSIONS

This study confirmed that rabies in the wild represents a threat for humans. The outbreak described here originated in vampire bats and was transmitted to humans by a cat, pointing out the nexus between wild rabies and the urban ecosystem which cats represent, thereby becoming a target for rabies' control and prevention activities. This study underlines the urgency of implementing and maintaining rabies control and prevention activities in the wild to minimise its impact on humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratorio de Virología, Laboratorio de Patología, Subdirección de Vigilancia y Control en Salud Pública, Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogotá, Colombia. apaezm@ins.gov.coNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

spa

PubMed ID

20379666

Citation

Paez, Andrés, et al. "[An Outbreak of Human Rabies Transmitted By a Cat in the Town of Santander De Quilichao, Colombia, 2008]." Revista De Salud Publica (Bogota, Colombia), vol. 11, no. 6, 2009, pp. 931-43.
Paez A, Polo L, Heredia D, et al. [An outbreak of human rabies transmitted by a cat in the town of Santander de Quilichao, Colombia, 2008]. Rev Salud Publica (Bogota). 2009;11(6):931-43.
Paez, A., Polo, L., Heredia, D., Nuñez, C., Rodriguez, M., Agudelo, C., Parra, E., Paredes, A., Moreno, T., & Rey, G. (2009). [An outbreak of human rabies transmitted by a cat in the town of Santander de Quilichao, Colombia, 2008]. Revista De Salud Publica (Bogota, Colombia), 11(6), 931-43.
Paez A, et al. [An Outbreak of Human Rabies Transmitted By a Cat in the Town of Santander De Quilichao, Colombia, 2008]. Rev Salud Publica (Bogota). 2009;11(6):931-43. PubMed PMID: 20379666.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [An outbreak of human rabies transmitted by a cat in the town of Santander de Quilichao, Colombia, 2008]. AU - Paez,Andrés, AU - Polo,Luis, AU - Heredia,Damaris, AU - Nuñez,Constanza, AU - Rodriguez,Milena, AU - Agudelo,Carlos, AU - Parra,Edgar, AU - Paredes,Andrea, AU - Moreno,Teresa, AU - Rey,Gloria, PY - 2009/09/09/received PY - 2009/10/15/accepted PY - 2010/4/10/entrez PY - 2010/4/10/pubmed PY - 2010/8/25/medline SP - 931 EP - 43 JF - Revista de salud publica (Bogota, Colombia) JO - Rev Salud Publica (Bogota) VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: A sylvatic rabies outbreak during March 2008 caused two human deaths in the town of Santander de Quilichao in Cauca, Colombia. This article describes the diagnostic laboratory techniques used, the field investigation and focus control used, as well as this outbreak's epidemiological significance and implications for public health. METHODS: Rabies was diagnosed by direct immunofluorescence, biological tests involving inoculating mice, histopathology and immunohistochemistry and then typed by using monoclonal antibodies. Field investigation focused on searching for human and animal contacts, identifying suspicious cases and conducting an institutional search for rabid accidents. Focus control consisted of post-exposure treatment of the exposed population, vaccinating dogs and cats, collecting and eliminating stray animals and educating the community. RESULTS: Two human rabies cases were confirmed in the laboratory and another was inferred in a cat by epidemiological nexus. Antigenic variant 3 was isolated from the human cases. 11,369 dogs, 3,325 cats and 217 humans were vaccinated. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed that rabies in the wild represents a threat for humans. The outbreak described here originated in vampire bats and was transmitted to humans by a cat, pointing out the nexus between wild rabies and the urban ecosystem which cats represent, thereby becoming a target for rabies' control and prevention activities. This study underlines the urgency of implementing and maintaining rabies control and prevention activities in the wild to minimise its impact on humans. SN - 0124-0064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20379666/[An_outbreak_of_human_rabies_transmitted_by_a_cat_in_the_town_of_Santander_de_Quilichao_Colombia_2008]_ L2 - https://www.scielosp.org/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0124-00642009000600009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -