Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Total antioxidant capacity intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.
Cancer Causes Control 2010; 21(8):1315-21CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) intake and colorectal cancer incidence.

METHODS

TAC intake was assessed in 1986 and every 4 years thereafter in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a prospective cohort study of 47,339 men. Between 1986 and 2004, 952 colorectal cancer cases were diagnosed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).

RESULTS

Comparing the highest versus lowest quintile, TAC intake from foods only (dietary TAC) was not associated with colorectal (multivariate-RR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.78, 1.23) or colon (multivariate-RR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.61) cancer risk, but was inversely associated with rectal cancer risk (multivariate-RR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.96). For the same comparison, TAC intake from foods and supplements (total TAC) was not associated with colorectal (multivariate-RR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.14), colon (multivariate-RR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.33), or rectal (multivariate-RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.52, 1.38) cancer risk.

CONCLUSIONS

Dietary and total TAC intakes were not associated with colorectal and colon cancer risk. Dietary, but not total, TAC intake was inversely associated with rectal cancer risk, suggesting antioxidants per se may not be associated with rectal cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Bldg 2, Rm 355A, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Rmekary@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20390446

Citation

Mekary, Rania A., et al. "Total Antioxidant Capacity Intake and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 21, no. 8, 2010, pp. 1315-21.
Mekary RA, Wu K, Giovannucci E, et al. Total antioxidant capacity intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2010;21(8):1315-21.
Mekary, R. A., Wu, K., Giovannucci, E., Sampson, L., Fuchs, C., Spiegelman, D., ... Smith-Warner, S. A. (2010). Total antioxidant capacity intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 21(8), pp. 1315-21. doi:10.1007/s10552-010-9559-9.
Mekary RA, et al. Total Antioxidant Capacity Intake and Colorectal Cancer Risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Cancer Causes Control. 2010;21(8):1315-21. PubMed PMID: 20390446.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total antioxidant capacity intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. AU - Mekary,Rania A, AU - Wu,Kana, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Sampson,Laura, AU - Fuchs,Charles, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Smith-Warner,Stephanie A, PY - 2009/04/20/received PY - 2010/03/26/accepted PY - 2010/4/15/entrez PY - 2010/4/15/pubmed PY - 2010/11/3/medline SP - 1315 EP - 21 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 21 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) intake and colorectal cancer incidence. METHODS: TAC intake was assessed in 1986 and every 4 years thereafter in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a prospective cohort study of 47,339 men. Between 1986 and 2004, 952 colorectal cancer cases were diagnosed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Comparing the highest versus lowest quintile, TAC intake from foods only (dietary TAC) was not associated with colorectal (multivariate-RR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.78, 1.23) or colon (multivariate-RR: 1.20; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.61) cancer risk, but was inversely associated with rectal cancer risk (multivariate-RR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35, 0.96). For the same comparison, TAC intake from foods and supplements (total TAC) was not associated with colorectal (multivariate-RR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.14), colon (multivariate-RR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.33), or rectal (multivariate-RR: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.52, 1.38) cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary and total TAC intakes were not associated with colorectal and colon cancer risk. Dietary, but not total, TAC intake was inversely associated with rectal cancer risk, suggesting antioxidants per se may not be associated with rectal cancer risk. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20390446/Total_antioxidant_capacity_intake_and_colorectal_cancer_risk_in_the_Health_Professionals_Follow_up_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9559-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -