Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Heavy metals in summer squash fruits grown in soil amended with municipal sewage sludge.
J Environ Sci Health B 2010; 45(2):167-73JE

Abstract

The increasing awareness of the value of vegetables and fruits in the human diet requires monitoring of heavy metals in food crops. The effects of amending soil with compost made from municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and MSS mixed with yard waste (MSS-YW) on Cd, Cr, Mo, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni concentrations in soil and the potential bioaccumulation of heavy metals in squash fruits at harvest were investigated. A field study was conducted in a silty-loam soil at Kentucky State University Research Farm. Eighteen plots of 22 x 3.7 m each were separated using metal borders and the soil in six plots was mixed with MSS at 15 t acre(-1), six plots were mixed with MSS-YW at 15 t acre(-1) (on dry weight basis), and six unamended plots (no-mulch) were used for comparison purposes. Plots were planted with summer squash and heavy metals were analyzed in soil and mature fruits at harvest. Analysis of heavy metals in squash fruits was conducted using inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. Zinc and Cu concentrations in soil mixed with MSS were extremely high compared to other metals. In squash fruits, concentrations of Zn were generally greater than Cu. Total squash marketable yield was greatest in MSS-YW and MSS treatments compared to no-mulch conventional soil. Concentrations of Cd and Pb in soil amended with MSS averaged 0.1 and 1.4 mg kg(-1), respectively. These levels were much lower than the limits in the U.S. guidelines for using MSS in land farming. Data revealed that maximum concentrations of Cd and Pb in squash fruits were 0.03 and 0.01 microg g(-1) dry fruit, respectively. Nickel concentration in squash fruits fluctuated among harvest dates reaching a maximum of 2.5 microg g(-1) dry fruit. However, these concentrations were far below their permissible limits in edible fruits.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plant and Soil Science, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, USA. george.antonious@kysu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20390947

Citation

Antonious, George F., et al. "Heavy Metals in Summer Squash Fruits Grown in Soil Amended With Municipal Sewage Sludge." Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part. B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes, vol. 45, no. 2, 2010, pp. 167-73.
Antonious GF, Snyder JC, Dennis SO. Heavy metals in summer squash fruits grown in soil amended with municipal sewage sludge. J Environ Sci Health B. 2010;45(2):167-73.
Antonious, G. F., Snyder, J. C., & Dennis, S. O. (2010). Heavy metals in summer squash fruits grown in soil amended with municipal sewage sludge. Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part. B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes, 45(2), pp. 167-73. doi:10.1080/03601230903472223.
Antonious GF, Snyder JC, Dennis SO. Heavy Metals in Summer Squash Fruits Grown in Soil Amended With Municipal Sewage Sludge. J Environ Sci Health B. 2010;45(2):167-73. PubMed PMID: 20390947.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heavy metals in summer squash fruits grown in soil amended with municipal sewage sludge. AU - Antonious,George F, AU - Snyder,John C, AU - Dennis,Sam O, PY - 2010/4/15/entrez PY - 2010/4/15/pubmed PY - 2010/8/14/medline SP - 167 EP - 73 JF - Journal of environmental science and health. Part. B, Pesticides, food contaminants, and agricultural wastes JO - J Environ Sci Health B VL - 45 IS - 2 N2 - The increasing awareness of the value of vegetables and fruits in the human diet requires monitoring of heavy metals in food crops. The effects of amending soil with compost made from municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and MSS mixed with yard waste (MSS-YW) on Cd, Cr, Mo, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni concentrations in soil and the potential bioaccumulation of heavy metals in squash fruits at harvest were investigated. A field study was conducted in a silty-loam soil at Kentucky State University Research Farm. Eighteen plots of 22 x 3.7 m each were separated using metal borders and the soil in six plots was mixed with MSS at 15 t acre(-1), six plots were mixed with MSS-YW at 15 t acre(-1) (on dry weight basis), and six unamended plots (no-mulch) were used for comparison purposes. Plots were planted with summer squash and heavy metals were analyzed in soil and mature fruits at harvest. Analysis of heavy metals in squash fruits was conducted using inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. Zinc and Cu concentrations in soil mixed with MSS were extremely high compared to other metals. In squash fruits, concentrations of Zn were generally greater than Cu. Total squash marketable yield was greatest in MSS-YW and MSS treatments compared to no-mulch conventional soil. Concentrations of Cd and Pb in soil amended with MSS averaged 0.1 and 1.4 mg kg(-1), respectively. These levels were much lower than the limits in the U.S. guidelines for using MSS in land farming. Data revealed that maximum concentrations of Cd and Pb in squash fruits were 0.03 and 0.01 microg g(-1) dry fruit, respectively. Nickel concentration in squash fruits fluctuated among harvest dates reaching a maximum of 2.5 microg g(-1) dry fruit. However, these concentrations were far below their permissible limits in edible fruits. SN - 1532-4109 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20390947/Heavy_metals_in_summer_squash_fruits_grown_in_soil_amended_with_municipal_sewage_sludge_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03601230903472223 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -