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A survey of reasons why veterinarians enter rural veterinary practice in the United States.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2010 Apr 15; 236(8):849-57.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify factors associated with interest in or choosing a career in rural veterinary practice (RVP).

DESIGN

Cross-sectional descriptive study.

SAMPLE POPULATION

Veterinarians and veterinary students in the United States.

PROCEDURES

Veterinary students and veterinarians in any area of practice were solicited to participate in an online survey through invitation letters sent to various veterinary associations. Proportions of respondents assigning high importance to various factors were analyzed for differences among gender, age, and background groups.

RESULTS

1,216 responses were received. In general, survey respondents indicated that RVP could be characterized as the practice of veterinary medicine in any community where agriculture represented a significant part of the local economy. Responses also indicated that RVP should not be confused with large animal or food animal exclusive practice. Most respondents (38.9%) developed an interest in RVP early in life (before 8th grade), with 13.0% reportedly developing their interest in RVP during veterinary school. The most highly ranked factors with regard to influence on developing an interest in RVP were having relatives with a farm background, having a veterinarian in RVP as a mentor, and exposure to RVP during veterinary school. Gender, generational category, background (rural vs urban), and livestock experience were significantly associated with when respondents developed an interest in RVP and with factors important in developing that interest.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results of the present study suggested that various factors are associated with interest in and choosing a career in RVP. These factors should be considered when strategies for increasing interest and encouraging careers in RVP are planned.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA. aurora.villarroel@oregonstate.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20392180

Citation

Villarroel, Aurora, et al. "A Survey of Reasons Why Veterinarians Enter Rural Veterinary Practice in the United States." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 236, no. 8, 2010, pp. 849-57.
Villarroel A, McDonald SR, Walker WL, et al. A survey of reasons why veterinarians enter rural veterinary practice in the United States. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2010;236(8):849-57.
Villarroel, A., McDonald, S. R., Walker, W. L., Kaiser, L., Dewell, R. D., & Dewell, G. A. (2010). A survey of reasons why veterinarians enter rural veterinary practice in the United States. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 236(8), 849-57. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.236.8.849
Villarroel A, et al. A Survey of Reasons Why Veterinarians Enter Rural Veterinary Practice in the United States. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2010 Apr 15;236(8):849-57. PubMed PMID: 20392180.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A survey of reasons why veterinarians enter rural veterinary practice in the United States. AU - Villarroel,Aurora, AU - McDonald,Stephen R, AU - Walker,William L, AU - Kaiser,Lana, AU - Dewell,Reneé D, AU - Dewell,Grant A, PY - 2010/4/16/entrez PY - 2010/4/16/pubmed PY - 2010/5/12/medline SP - 849 EP - 57 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 236 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with interest in or choosing a career in rural veterinary practice (RVP). DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study. SAMPLE POPULATION: Veterinarians and veterinary students in the United States. PROCEDURES: Veterinary students and veterinarians in any area of practice were solicited to participate in an online survey through invitation letters sent to various veterinary associations. Proportions of respondents assigning high importance to various factors were analyzed for differences among gender, age, and background groups. RESULTS: 1,216 responses were received. In general, survey respondents indicated that RVP could be characterized as the practice of veterinary medicine in any community where agriculture represented a significant part of the local economy. Responses also indicated that RVP should not be confused with large animal or food animal exclusive practice. Most respondents (38.9%) developed an interest in RVP early in life (before 8th grade), with 13.0% reportedly developing their interest in RVP during veterinary school. The most highly ranked factors with regard to influence on developing an interest in RVP were having relatives with a farm background, having a veterinarian in RVP as a mentor, and exposure to RVP during veterinary school. Gender, generational category, background (rural vs urban), and livestock experience were significantly associated with when respondents developed an interest in RVP and with factors important in developing that interest. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results of the present study suggested that various factors are associated with interest in and choosing a career in RVP. These factors should be considered when strategies for increasing interest and encouraging careers in RVP are planned. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20392180/A_survey_of_reasons_why_veterinarians_enter_rural_veterinary_practice_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/10.2460/javma.236.8.849?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -