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Vitamin D and calcium intakes and breast cancer risk in pre- and postmenopausal women.
Am J Clin Nutr 2010; 91(6):1699-707AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Some evidence suggests that vitamin D may reduce breast cancer risk. Despite the biological interaction between vitamin D and calcium, few studies have evaluated their joint effects on breast cancer risk.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to evaluate the associations and potential interaction between vitamin D and calcium (from food and supplements) and breast cancer risk in a population-based case-control study.

DESIGN

Breast cancer cases aged 25-74 y (diagnosed 2002-2003) were identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry. Controls were identified by using random digit dialing; 3101 cases and 3471 controls completed epidemiologic and food-frequency questionnaires. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were estimated by using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS

Vitamin D and calcium intakes from food only and total combined intakes (food and supplements) were not associated with breast cancer risk, although the mean intake of vitamin D was low. Vitamin D supplement intake >10 microg/d (400 IU/d) compared with no intake was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (adjusted OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.98). No categories of calcium supplement intake were significantly associated with reduced breast cancer risk, but a significant inverse trend was observed (P = 0.04). There were no significant interactions involving vitamin D, calcium, or menopausal status.

CONCLUSIONS

No associations were found between overall vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk. Vitamin D from supplements was independently associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of higher doses of vitamin D and calcium supplements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada. laura.anderson@cancercare.on.ca <laura.anderson@cancercare.on.ca>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20392891

Citation

Anderson, Laura N., et al. "Vitamin D and Calcium Intakes and Breast Cancer Risk in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 91, no. 6, 2010, pp. 1699-707.
Anderson LN, Cotterchio M, Vieth R, et al. Vitamin D and calcium intakes and breast cancer risk in pre- and postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(6):1699-707.
Anderson, L. N., Cotterchio, M., Vieth, R., & Knight, J. A. (2010). Vitamin D and calcium intakes and breast cancer risk in pre- and postmenopausal women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91(6), pp. 1699-707. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.28869.
Anderson LN, et al. Vitamin D and Calcium Intakes and Breast Cancer Risk in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(6):1699-707. PubMed PMID: 20392891.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D and calcium intakes and breast cancer risk in pre- and postmenopausal women. AU - Anderson,Laura N, AU - Cotterchio,Michelle, AU - Vieth,Reinhold, AU - Knight,Julia A, Y1 - 2010/04/14/ PY - 2010/4/16/entrez PY - 2010/4/16/pubmed PY - 2010/6/11/medline SP - 1699 EP - 707 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 91 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Some evidence suggests that vitamin D may reduce breast cancer risk. Despite the biological interaction between vitamin D and calcium, few studies have evaluated their joint effects on breast cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate the associations and potential interaction between vitamin D and calcium (from food and supplements) and breast cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. DESIGN: Breast cancer cases aged 25-74 y (diagnosed 2002-2003) were identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry. Controls were identified by using random digit dialing; 3101 cases and 3471 controls completed epidemiologic and food-frequency questionnaires. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were estimated by using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Vitamin D and calcium intakes from food only and total combined intakes (food and supplements) were not associated with breast cancer risk, although the mean intake of vitamin D was low. Vitamin D supplement intake >10 microg/d (400 IU/d) compared with no intake was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (adjusted OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.98). No categories of calcium supplement intake were significantly associated with reduced breast cancer risk, but a significant inverse trend was observed (P = 0.04). There were no significant interactions involving vitamin D, calcium, or menopausal status. CONCLUSIONS: No associations were found between overall vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk. Vitamin D from supplements was independently associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of higher doses of vitamin D and calcium supplements. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20392891/Vitamin_D_and_calcium_intakes_and_breast_cancer_risk_in_pre__and_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28869 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -