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Dissociative symptoms and reported trauma among patients with spirit possession and matched healthy controls in Uganda.
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010 Jun; 34(2):380-400.CM

Abstract

Spirit possession is a common, worldwide phenomenon with dissociative features. Studies in Europe and the United States have revealed associations among psychoform and somatoform dissociation and (reported) potential traumatic events. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among spirit possession, dissociative symptoms and reported potentially traumatizing events in Uganda. One hundred nineteen persons with spirit possession, diagnosed by traditional healers, were compared to a matched control group of 71 nonpossessed persons. Assessments included demographic items and measures of dissociation and potentially traumatizing events. Compared to the nonpossessed group, the possessed group reported more severe psychoform dissociation and somatoform dissociation and more potentially traumatizing events. The associations between these events and both types of dissociation were significant. Yet, consistent with the cultural perception of dissociative symptoms, the participants subjectively did not associate dissociative symptoms with potentially traumatizing events. In conclusion, spirit possession deserves more interest as a possible idiom of distress and a culture-specific expression of dissociation related to potential traumatizing events.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinic for Refugees at Center 45, Oegstgeest, The Netherlands. marjolein.vanduijl@planet.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20401630

Citation

van Duijl, Marjolein, et al. "Dissociative Symptoms and Reported Trauma Among Patients With Spirit Possession and Matched Healthy Controls in Uganda." Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, vol. 34, no. 2, 2010, pp. 380-400.
van Duijl M, Nijenhuis E, Komproe IH, et al. Dissociative symptoms and reported trauma among patients with spirit possession and matched healthy controls in Uganda. Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010;34(2):380-400.
van Duijl, M., Nijenhuis, E., Komproe, I. H., Gernaat, H. B., & de Jong, J. T. (2010). Dissociative symptoms and reported trauma among patients with spirit possession and matched healthy controls in Uganda. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 34(2), 380-400. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11013-010-9171-1
van Duijl M, et al. Dissociative Symptoms and Reported Trauma Among Patients With Spirit Possession and Matched Healthy Controls in Uganda. Cult Med Psychiatry. 2010;34(2):380-400. PubMed PMID: 20401630.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dissociative symptoms and reported trauma among patients with spirit possession and matched healthy controls in Uganda. AU - van Duijl,Marjolein, AU - Nijenhuis,Ellert, AU - Komproe,Ivan H, AU - Gernaat,Hajo B P E, AU - de Jong,Joop T, PY - 2010/4/20/entrez PY - 2010/4/20/pubmed PY - 2010/9/3/medline SP - 380 EP - 400 JF - Culture, medicine and psychiatry JO - Cult Med Psychiatry VL - 34 IS - 2 N2 - Spirit possession is a common, worldwide phenomenon with dissociative features. Studies in Europe and the United States have revealed associations among psychoform and somatoform dissociation and (reported) potential traumatic events. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among spirit possession, dissociative symptoms and reported potentially traumatizing events in Uganda. One hundred nineteen persons with spirit possession, diagnosed by traditional healers, were compared to a matched control group of 71 nonpossessed persons. Assessments included demographic items and measures of dissociation and potentially traumatizing events. Compared to the nonpossessed group, the possessed group reported more severe psychoform dissociation and somatoform dissociation and more potentially traumatizing events. The associations between these events and both types of dissociation were significant. Yet, consistent with the cultural perception of dissociative symptoms, the participants subjectively did not associate dissociative symptoms with potentially traumatizing events. In conclusion, spirit possession deserves more interest as a possible idiom of distress and a culture-specific expression of dissociation related to potential traumatizing events. SN - 1573-076X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20401630/Dissociative_symptoms_and_reported_trauma_among_patients_with_spirit_possession_and_matched_healthy_controls_in_Uganda_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11013-010-9171-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -