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Music playing and memory trace: evidence from event-related potentials.
Neurosci Res. 2010 Aug; 67(4):334-40.NR

Abstract

We examined the relationship between motor practice and auditory memory for sound sequences to evaluate the hypothesis that practice involving physical performance might enhance auditory memory. Participants learned two unfamiliar sound sequences using different training methods. Under the key-press condition, they learned a melody while pressing a key during auditory input. Under the no-key-press condition, they listened to another melody without any key pressing. The two melodies were presented alternately, and all participants were trained in both methods. Participants were instructed to pay attention under both conditions. After training, they listened to the two melodies again without pressing keys, and ERPs were recorded. During the ERP recordings, 10% of the tones in these melodies deviated from the originals. The grand-average ERPs showed that the amplitude of mismatch negativity (MMN) elicited by deviant stimuli was larger under the key-press condition than under the no-key-press condition. This effect appeared only in the high absolute pitch group, which included those with a pronounced ability to identify a note without external reference. This result suggests that the effect of training with key pressing was mediated by individual musical skills.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory for Biolinguistics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20403394

Citation

Kamiyama, Keiko, et al. "Music Playing and Memory Trace: Evidence From Event-related Potentials." Neuroscience Research, vol. 67, no. 4, 2010, pp. 334-40.
Kamiyama K, Katahira K, Abla D, et al. Music playing and memory trace: evidence from event-related potentials. Neurosci Res. 2010;67(4):334-40.
Kamiyama, K., Katahira, K., Abla, D., Hori, K., & Okanoya, K. (2010). Music playing and memory trace: evidence from event-related potentials. Neuroscience Research, 67(4), 334-40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neures.2010.04.007
Kamiyama K, et al. Music Playing and Memory Trace: Evidence From Event-related Potentials. Neurosci Res. 2010;67(4):334-40. PubMed PMID: 20403394.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Music playing and memory trace: evidence from event-related potentials. AU - Kamiyama,Keiko, AU - Katahira,Kentaro, AU - Abla,Dilshat, AU - Hori,Koji, AU - Okanoya,Kazuo, Y1 - 2010/04/18/ PY - 2009/12/09/received PY - 2010/03/30/revised PY - 2010/04/12/accepted PY - 2010/4/21/entrez PY - 2010/4/21/pubmed PY - 2011/2/23/medline SP - 334 EP - 40 JF - Neuroscience research JO - Neurosci Res VL - 67 IS - 4 N2 - We examined the relationship between motor practice and auditory memory for sound sequences to evaluate the hypothesis that practice involving physical performance might enhance auditory memory. Participants learned two unfamiliar sound sequences using different training methods. Under the key-press condition, they learned a melody while pressing a key during auditory input. Under the no-key-press condition, they listened to another melody without any key pressing. The two melodies were presented alternately, and all participants were trained in both methods. Participants were instructed to pay attention under both conditions. After training, they listened to the two melodies again without pressing keys, and ERPs were recorded. During the ERP recordings, 10% of the tones in these melodies deviated from the originals. The grand-average ERPs showed that the amplitude of mismatch negativity (MMN) elicited by deviant stimuli was larger under the key-press condition than under the no-key-press condition. This effect appeared only in the high absolute pitch group, which included those with a pronounced ability to identify a note without external reference. This result suggests that the effect of training with key pressing was mediated by individual musical skills. SN - 1872-8111 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20403394/Music_playing_and_memory_trace:_evidence_from_event_related_potentials_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0168-0102(10)00113-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -