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Schmidtea mediterranea: a model system for analysis of motile cilia.
Methods Cell Biol. 2009; 93:81-98.MC

Abstract

Cilia are cellular organelles that appeared early in the evolution of eukaryotes. These structures and the pool of about 600genes involved in their assembly and function are highly conserved in organisms as distant as single-cell protists, like Chlamydomonas reinhardtti, and humans (Silflow and Lefebvre, 2001). A significant body of work on the biology of cilia has been produced over the years, with the help of powerful model organisms including C. reinhardtti, Caenorhabditis elegans, sea urchins, and mice. However, specific limitations of these systems, especially regarding the ability to efficiently study gene loss-of-function, warrant the search for a new model organism to study cilia and cilia-based motility. Schmidtea mediterranea is a species of planarian (Class: Tubellaria) with a well-defined monostratified ciliated epithelium, which contributes to the motility of the organism, in addition to other more specialized ciliary structures. The use of S. mediterranea as an experimental system to study stem cell biology and regeneration has led to a recently sequenced genome and to the development of a wide array of powerful tools including the ability to inhibit gene expression via RNA interference. In addition, we have developed and describe here a number of methods for analyzing motile cilia in S. mediterranea. Overall, S. mediterranea is a highly versatile, easy to maintain, and genetically tractable organism that provides a powerful alternative model system for the study of motile cilia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Molecular, Microbial & Structural Biology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-3305, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20409812

Citation

Rompolas, Panteleimon, et al. "Schmidtea Mediterranea: a Model System for Analysis of Motile Cilia." Methods in Cell Biology, vol. 93, 2009, pp. 81-98.
Rompolas P, Patel-King RS, King SM. Schmidtea mediterranea: a model system for analysis of motile cilia. Methods Cell Biol. 2009;93:81-98.
Rompolas, P., Patel-King, R. S., & King, S. M. (2009). Schmidtea mediterranea: a model system for analysis of motile cilia. Methods in Cell Biology, 93, 81-98. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0091-679X(08)93004-1
Rompolas P, Patel-King RS, King SM. Schmidtea Mediterranea: a Model System for Analysis of Motile Cilia. Methods Cell Biol. 2009;93:81-98. PubMed PMID: 20409812.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Schmidtea mediterranea: a model system for analysis of motile cilia. AU - Rompolas,Panteleimon, AU - Patel-King,Ramila S, AU - King,Stephen M, Y1 - 2009/12/04/ PY - 2010/4/23/entrez PY - 2009/1/1/pubmed PY - 2010/7/10/medline SP - 81 EP - 98 JF - Methods in cell biology JO - Methods Cell Biol. VL - 93 N2 - Cilia are cellular organelles that appeared early in the evolution of eukaryotes. These structures and the pool of about 600genes involved in their assembly and function are highly conserved in organisms as distant as single-cell protists, like Chlamydomonas reinhardtti, and humans (Silflow and Lefebvre, 2001). A significant body of work on the biology of cilia has been produced over the years, with the help of powerful model organisms including C. reinhardtti, Caenorhabditis elegans, sea urchins, and mice. However, specific limitations of these systems, especially regarding the ability to efficiently study gene loss-of-function, warrant the search for a new model organism to study cilia and cilia-based motility. Schmidtea mediterranea is a species of planarian (Class: Tubellaria) with a well-defined monostratified ciliated epithelium, which contributes to the motility of the organism, in addition to other more specialized ciliary structures. The use of S. mediterranea as an experimental system to study stem cell biology and regeneration has led to a recently sequenced genome and to the development of a wide array of powerful tools including the ability to inhibit gene expression via RNA interference. In addition, we have developed and describe here a number of methods for analyzing motile cilia in S. mediterranea. Overall, S. mediterranea is a highly versatile, easy to maintain, and genetically tractable organism that provides a powerful alternative model system for the study of motile cilia. SN - 0091-679X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20409812/Schmidtea_mediterranea:_a_model_system_for_analysis_of_motile_cilia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-679X(08)93004-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -