Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Maternal prenatal stress and later child behavioral problems in an urban South African setting.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010 Mar; 49(3):239-47.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Findings from a number of cohort studies suggest that children who are exposed to maternal stress during pregnancy have an increased risk of behavioral problems. All of the research assessing this association to date has been conducted in developed countries; yet the majority of the child population, and the majority of the burden of psychopathology, exist in developing nations, where different patterns and levels of stressors may exist. The present study set out to examine whether maternal prenatal stress is associated with an increased risk of subsequent child behavioral problems in a developing country.

METHOD

Participants (n = 953) were from Birth to Twenty, a longitudinal birth cohort study based in Soweto-Johannesburg, South Africa, a socioeconomically disadvantaged urban area. Pregnant women completed questionnaires assessing stressors, and children's behavioral functioning was subsequently assessed when they were aged 2 and 4 years.

RESULTS

Children whose mothers had high levels of prenatal stressors did not have an increased risk of behavioral problems at age 2 years, but they did at 4 years (adjusted odds ratio 2.52 [CI = 1.04, 6.09]). Partner conflict and family adversity were the stressors most strongly associated with adverse child outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings highlight the importance of the psychological health of pregnant women in developing countries, both for the mother and her offspring, and the need for greater research in resource-poor settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 7JX, UKUK. paul.ramchandani@psych.ox.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20410713

Citation

Ramchandani, Paul G., et al. "Maternal Prenatal Stress and Later Child Behavioral Problems in an Urban South African Setting." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 49, no. 3, 2010, pp. 239-47.
Ramchandani PG, Richter LM, Norris SA, et al. Maternal prenatal stress and later child behavioral problems in an urban South African setting. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010;49(3):239-47.
Ramchandani, P. G., Richter, L. M., Norris, S. A., & Stein, A. (2010). Maternal prenatal stress and later child behavioral problems in an urban South African setting. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 49(3), 239-47.
Ramchandani PG, et al. Maternal Prenatal Stress and Later Child Behavioral Problems in an Urban South African Setting. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010;49(3):239-47. PubMed PMID: 20410713.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal prenatal stress and later child behavioral problems in an urban South African setting. AU - Ramchandani,Paul G, AU - Richter,Linda M, AU - Norris,Shane A, AU - Stein,Alan, PY - 2010/4/23/entrez PY - 2010/4/23/pubmed PY - 2010/8/31/medline SP - 239 EP - 47 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry JO - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 49 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Findings from a number of cohort studies suggest that children who are exposed to maternal stress during pregnancy have an increased risk of behavioral problems. All of the research assessing this association to date has been conducted in developed countries; yet the majority of the child population, and the majority of the burden of psychopathology, exist in developing nations, where different patterns and levels of stressors may exist. The present study set out to examine whether maternal prenatal stress is associated with an increased risk of subsequent child behavioral problems in a developing country. METHOD: Participants (n = 953) were from Birth to Twenty, a longitudinal birth cohort study based in Soweto-Johannesburg, South Africa, a socioeconomically disadvantaged urban area. Pregnant women completed questionnaires assessing stressors, and children's behavioral functioning was subsequently assessed when they were aged 2 and 4 years. RESULTS: Children whose mothers had high levels of prenatal stressors did not have an increased risk of behavioral problems at age 2 years, but they did at 4 years (adjusted odds ratio 2.52 [CI = 1.04, 6.09]). Partner conflict and family adversity were the stressors most strongly associated with adverse child outcome. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of the psychological health of pregnant women in developing countries, both for the mother and her offspring, and the need for greater research in resource-poor settings. SN - 1527-5418 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20410713/Maternal_prenatal_stress_and_later_child_behavioral_problems_in_an_urban_South_African_setting_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/00004583-201003000-00007 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -