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Obesity-related lipid profile and altered insulin incretion in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome.
J Adolesc Health 2010; 46(5):474-81JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

The objective of this study was evaluate influence of body mass index (BMI), hyperinsulinemia and/or insulin resistance (IR), and androgens on the lipid profile of adolescent polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

METHODS

A total of 71 PCOS and 94 healthy adolescent girls from a Southern Italian region were included in the study. At day 5-8 of menstrual cycle, patients underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test to evaluate insulin levels; lipid and homocysteine levels were also assessed, baseline hormonal assays and ultrasound examination performed, and anthropometric characteristics measured.

RESULT

No differences were observed in the incidence of overweight or obesity and total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; triglycerides and homocysteine levels did not differ between PCOS and control groups. All fasting metabolic indexes were similar, whereas insulin secretion after glucose load (I-AUC) was significantly higher in PCOS subjects. Total cholesterol levels were significantly related to waist-hip ratio (WHR). Low-density lipoprotein level was positively correlated with BMI, waist, WHR, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) but not I-AUC. Findings obtained for HDL correlated negatively to the same parameters, being also negatively correlated to both fasting insulin and HOMA, but not I-AUC. Moreover, HDL was positively correlated to circulating androstenedione (A) and negatively to circulating testosterone (T) levels. Triglycerides seemed to correlate positively with body BMI, waist, and WHR, and negatively with A levels. Homocysteine levels correlated positively with plasma triglyceride content.

CONCLUSION

In the adolescent population studied, no differences were revealed in lipid profile between PCOS and controls. The PCOS is not a discriminant factor. The anthropometric characteristics resulted in the primary factor influencing the lipid derangement, confirming the importance of treating obesity at an early age to reduce morbidity rates. Hyperinsulinemia and IR, peculiarities of PCOS capable of influencing long-term evolution into cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus, are not associated with worse lipid profile. Young patients should be encouraged and motivated to change their lifestyle, with the aim of losing weight and thus reducing risk of onset of overt dyslipidemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Cagliari, Via Ospedale Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. fulgh@tiscali.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20413084

Citation

Fulghesu, Annamaria, et al. "Obesity-related Lipid Profile and Altered Insulin Incretion in Adolescents With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 46, no. 5, 2010, pp. 474-81.
Fulghesu A, Magnini R, Portoghese E, et al. Obesity-related lipid profile and altered insulin incretion in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome. J Adolesc Health. 2010;46(5):474-81.
Fulghesu, A., Magnini, R., Portoghese, E., Angioni, S., Minerba, L., & Melis, G. B. (2010). Obesity-related lipid profile and altered insulin incretion in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 46(5), pp. 474-81. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2009.10.008.
Fulghesu A, et al. Obesity-related Lipid Profile and Altered Insulin Incretion in Adolescents With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. J Adolesc Health. 2010;46(5):474-81. PubMed PMID: 20413084.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity-related lipid profile and altered insulin incretion in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome. AU - Fulghesu,Annamaria, AU - Magnini,Roberta, AU - Portoghese,Elaine, AU - Angioni,Stefano, AU - Minerba,Luigi, AU - Melis,Gian Benedetto, Y1 - 2010/01/04/ PY - 2009/05/07/received PY - 2009/10/20/revised PY - 2009/10/22/accepted PY - 2010/4/24/entrez PY - 2010/4/24/pubmed PY - 2010/7/30/medline SP - 474 EP - 81 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 46 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: The objective of this study was evaluate influence of body mass index (BMI), hyperinsulinemia and/or insulin resistance (IR), and androgens on the lipid profile of adolescent polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). METHODS: A total of 71 PCOS and 94 healthy adolescent girls from a Southern Italian region were included in the study. At day 5-8 of menstrual cycle, patients underwent a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test to evaluate insulin levels; lipid and homocysteine levels were also assessed, baseline hormonal assays and ultrasound examination performed, and anthropometric characteristics measured. RESULT: No differences were observed in the incidence of overweight or obesity and total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; triglycerides and homocysteine levels did not differ between PCOS and control groups. All fasting metabolic indexes were similar, whereas insulin secretion after glucose load (I-AUC) was significantly higher in PCOS subjects. Total cholesterol levels were significantly related to waist-hip ratio (WHR). Low-density lipoprotein level was positively correlated with BMI, waist, WHR, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) but not I-AUC. Findings obtained for HDL correlated negatively to the same parameters, being also negatively correlated to both fasting insulin and HOMA, but not I-AUC. Moreover, HDL was positively correlated to circulating androstenedione (A) and negatively to circulating testosterone (T) levels. Triglycerides seemed to correlate positively with body BMI, waist, and WHR, and negatively with A levels. Homocysteine levels correlated positively with plasma triglyceride content. CONCLUSION: In the adolescent population studied, no differences were revealed in lipid profile between PCOS and controls. The PCOS is not a discriminant factor. The anthropometric characteristics resulted in the primary factor influencing the lipid derangement, confirming the importance of treating obesity at an early age to reduce morbidity rates. Hyperinsulinemia and IR, peculiarities of PCOS capable of influencing long-term evolution into cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus, are not associated with worse lipid profile. Young patients should be encouraged and motivated to change their lifestyle, with the aim of losing weight and thus reducing risk of onset of overt dyslipidemia. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20413084/Obesity_related_lipid_profile_and_altered_insulin_incretion_in_adolescents_with_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(09)00597-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -